print Font Size: small font medium font large font

Climate Change Blog

 

Hell or High Water: How Will CA Adapt to the Anthropocene?

News article Hell or High Water: How Will CA Adapt to the Anthropocene? (Published June 21, 2017)
Source: California magazine
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / California: Statewide / Dams and reservoirs / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 21, 2017)

 

Coastal Flooding

Report Coastal Flooding - "Here you will find resources that help shed light on the risks of near-term coastal flooding and future sea level rise scenarios. You can find tools from inside and outside government on coastal vulnerability and related climate change risks and impacts. You may access the framing questions used to select the data and content available for this theme." (Published )
Source: United States.
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 21, 2017)

 

The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching

News article The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching (Published June 16, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 15, 2017)

 

Trump budget would crush crucial weather data program

News article Trump budget would crush crucial weather data program (Published June 14, 2017)
Source: Reno Gazette-Journal
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. / Research /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

How the Bay Area Is Restoring Nature's Delicate Balance: As rising seas and demands for fresh water threaten San Francisco-area shorelines, the focus is on building tidal marsh

News article How the Bay Area Is Restoring Nature's Delicate Balance: As rising seas and demands for fresh water threaten San Francisco-area shorelines, the focus is on building tidal marsh (Published June 13, 2017)
Source: National Geographic
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

Rare US floods to become the norm if emissions aren't cut, study warns

News article Rare US floods to become the norm if emissions aren't cut, study warns
Related Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/aa6cb3
(Published June 8, 2017)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

Trump's EPA wants to focus on Superfund cleanups. Will its plans take climate change into account?

News article Trump's EPA wants to focus on Superfund cleanups. Will its plans take climate change into account? (Published June 14, 2017)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Water quality /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

Amplification of flood frequencies with local sea level rise and emerging flood regimes

Report Amplification of flood frequencies with local sea level rise and emerging flood regimes - "The amplification of flood frequencies by sea level rise (SLR) is expected to become one of the most economically damaging impacts of climate change for many coastal locations. Understanding the magnitude and pattern by which the frequency of current flood levels increase is important for developing more resilient coastal settlements, particularly since flood risk management (e.g. infrastructure, insurance, communications) is often tied to estimates of flood return periods. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fifth Assessment Report characterized the multiplication factor by which the frequency of flooding of a given height increases (referred to here as an amplification factor; AF). However, this characterization neither rigorously considered uncertainty in SLR nor distinguished between the amplification of different flooding levels (such as the 10% versus 0.2% annual chance floods); therefore, it may be seriously misleading. Because both historical flood frequency and projected SLR are uncertain, we combine joint probability distributions of the two to calculate AFs and their uncertainties over time. Under probabilistic relative sea level projections, while maintaining storm frequency fixed, we estimate a median 40-fold increase (ranging from 1- to 1314-fold) in the expected annual number of local 100-year floods for tide-gauge locations along the contiguous US coastline by 2050. While some places can expect disproportionate amplification of higher frequency events and thus primarily a greater number of historically precedented floods, others face amplification of lower frequency events and thus a particularly fast growing risk of historically unprecedented flooding. For example, with 50 cm of SLR, the 10%, 1%, and 0.2% annual chance floods are expected respectively to recur 108, 335, and 814 times as often in Seattle, but 148, 16, and 4 times as often in Charleston, SC." (Buchanan, M. K., et al., 2017, Environmental Research Letters) (Published June 7, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

40+ Years of Wetland Restoration in the San Francisco Bay: Lessons Learned and Future Directions

Report 40+ Years of Wetland Restoration in the San Francisco Bay: Lessons Learned and Future Directions - "How do you design a good habitat restoration project in San Francisco Bay? What have we learned from the last 40 years of restoration experience? And how do restoration designs need to change in the future, as we face sea level rise and declining sediment supply? Michelle Orr, a water resources engineer and wetland restoration practitioner with over 20 years of experience, answers these questions and more as she describes the evolution of tidal wetland restoration approaches in SF Bay, illustrated by specific projects, such as Sonoma Baylands, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, and Lower Walnut Creek and Pacheco Marsh. She will cover: Habitat for Endangered Species vs. Complete Tidal Wetland Systems; Integration with Flood Protection Sustainability and Adaptation to Sea-Level Rise." (53 min. video) (Published June 12, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Flooding / Sea level rise / Video Training /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

The Baylands and Climate Change: What Can We Do?

Report The Baylands and Climate Change: What Can We Do? - "In the 2015 Baylands Goals report, 200 scientists urge more restored wetlands and nature-based solutions to protect S.F. Bayshore communities from rising seas and extreme storms. Natural wetland and watershed systems, rather than dikes and levees, will better protect communities from flooding and increase recreation and wildlife benefits." (Published October 19, 2015)
Source: San Francisco Estuary Institute
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Video Training /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

Climate Adaptation Policy and Guidance Documents

Report Climate Adaptation Policy and Guidance Documents - "OPR's Integrated Climate Adaptation and Resiliency Program (ICARP) is responsible for coordinating and maintaining the State Adaptation Clearinghouse (PRC 71360). This document hosts climate change related executive orders, legislation, regulations and guidance that is applicable to the ICARP mandate. This document is an evolving resource OPR will be updating as new resources and information become available. OPR is collaborating with State agency partners, local and regional governments, and communities across the state to provide relevant and timely resources that advance climate adaptation and resiliency efforts throughout the state and beyond. This resource is hosted as a PDF that will be updated regularly at the ICARP website to respond to the most current policy guidance." (Published December 29, 2016)
Source: California. Governor's Office of Planning and Research
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / Planning Guides / Sample Climate Action Plans / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

Climate Ready Sonoma County: Climate Hazards and Vulnerabilities

Report Climate Ready Sonoma County: Climate Hazards and Vulnerabilities - "The purpose of this climate vulnerability assessment is to provide an initial screening of the county’s community resources that are vulnerable to climate change hazards. It is not intended to be a comprehensive vulnerability analysis or to provide site-specific prescriptions for action. Instead, the intent is to provide a starting point for a countywide discussion on climate impacts and our vulnerabilities to climate change. We hope it serves as a guide for elected officials, planners, engineers, land managers, and others in assessing risk from climate hazards and identifying strategies to reduce risk. It was developed as part of a broader planning framework called Climate Action 2020 to identify and implement specific, high-priority strategies to respond to the climate crisis here in Sonoma County." (Published February 28, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Bay Area and Delta / Sample Climate Action Plans /
(Posted June 14, 2017)

 

California's Delta Poised to Become Massive Carbon Bank

News article California's Delta Poised to Become Massive Carbon Bank (Published June 9, 2017)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change /
(Posted June 9, 2017)

 

Rising sea levels leave US coastal areas facing increased flood risk by 2050

News article Rising sea levels leave US coastal areas facing increased flood risk by 2050 (Published June 7, 2017)
Source: Environmental Research Web
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted June 7, 2017)

 

How did climate change affect that extreme weather event?

Report How did climate change affect that extreme weather event? - "Record-breaking heat and heavy downpours are just two types of extreme weather that are on the rise as Earth has warmed. While climate change is never the sole factor in any particular extreme weather event, teasing out its role can help government officials and businesses assess changing risks and better plan for the future. Watch this short animated video from the National Academies that explains how the science of extreme weather event attribution is like baking cookies! Read the full report, Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change" (Published May 2, 2017)
Source: National Academies
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted June 7, 2017)

 

Delta tunnels won't help on climate change (Opinion)

News article Delta tunnels won't help on climate change (Opinion) (Published June 6, 2017)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted June 6, 2017)

 

Climate-Smart Watershed Analyst

Report Climate-Smart Watershed Analyst - For Bay Area watersheds, gives historic precipitation, temperature, recharge, runoff, and evapotranspiration data and future scenarios. (Point Blue Conservation Science) (Published )
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Downscaled Climate Model Data / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted June 6, 2017)

 

What is Downscaling?

Report What is Downscaling? - An explanation of how global climate models can be downscaled in order to apply them to smaller local areas. (Climate Commons) (Published March 1, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Downscaling, How to /
(Posted June 6, 2017)

 

How much runoff originates as snow in the western United States, and how will that change in the future?

Report How much runoff originates as snow in the western United States, and how will that change in the future? - "In the western United States, the seasonal phase of snow storage bridges between winter-dominant precipitation and summer-dominant water demand. The critical role of snow in water supply has been frequently quantified using the ratio of snowmelt-derived runoff to total runoff. However, current estimates of the fraction of annual runoff generated by snowmelt are not based on systematic analyses. Here, based on hydrological model simulations and a new snowmelt tracking algorithm, we show that 53% of the total runoff in the western United States originates as snowmelt, despite only 37% of the precipitation falling as snow. In mountainous areas, snowmelt is responsible for 70% of the total runoff. By 2100, the contribution of snowmelt to runoff will decrease by one-third for the western U.S. in the IPCC RCP8.5 scenario. Snowmelt-derived runoff currently makes up two-thirds of the inflow to the region's major reservoirs. We argue that substantial impacts on water supply are likely in a warmer climate." (Li, D., et al., 2017, Geophysical Research Letters) (Published May 31, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted June 6, 2017)

 

Defying Trump, California forms climate alliance with 2 states

News article Defying Trump, California forms climate alliance with 2 states (Published June 2, 2017)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted June 2, 2017)

 

Trump Will Withdraw U.S. From Paris Climate Agreement

News article Trump Will Withdraw U.S. From Paris Climate Agreement (Published June 2, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted June 2, 2017)

 

Design teams compete for best solution to sea-level conundrum

News article Design teams compete for best solution to sea-level conundrum (Published May 31, 2017)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Santa Clara Valley Water District / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 31, 2017)

 

Hydroclimate: Understanding rainfall extremes

Report Hydroclimate: Understanding rainfall extremes - "Warming induced by greenhouse gases will increase the amount of moisture in the atmosphere, causing heavier rainfall events. Changing atmospheric circulation dynamics are now shown to either amplify or weaken regional increases, contributing to uncertainty in future precipitation extremes." (Lenderink, G. and H. J. Fowler, 2017, Nature Climate Change) (Published May 15, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted May 30, 2017)

 

Understanding the regional pattern of projected future changes in extreme precipitation

Report Understanding the regional pattern of projected future changes in extreme precipitation - "Changes in extreme precipitation are among the most impact-relevant consequences of climate warming, yet regional projections remain uncertain due to natural variability and model deficiencies in relevant physical processes. To better understand changes in extreme precipitation, they may be decomposed into contributions from atmospheric thermodynamics and dynamics, but these are typically diagnosed with spatially aggregated data or using a statistical approach that is not valid at all locations. Here we decompose the forced response of daily regional scale extreme precipitation in climate-model simulations into thermodynamic and dynamic contributions using a robust physical diagnostic. We show that thermodynamics alone would lead to a spatially homogeneous fractional increase, which is consistent across models and dominates the sign of the change in most regions. However, the dynamic contribution modifies regional responses, amplifying increases, for instance, in the Asian monsoon region, but weakening them across the Mediterranean, South Africa and Australia. Over subtropical oceans, the dynamic contribution is strong enough to cause robust regional decreases in extreme precipitation, which may partly result from a poleward circulation shift. The dynamic contribution is key to reducing uncertainties in future projections of regional extreme precipitation." (Pfahl, S., et al., 2017, Nature Climate Change) (Published May 15, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted May 30, 2017)

 

Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework

Report Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework - "Hydrologic alterations designed to provide a stable water supply and to prevent flooding are commonly used in mediterranean-climate river (med-rivers) basins, and these alterations have led to habitat loss and significant declines in aquatic biodiversity. Often the health of freshwater ecosystems depends on maintaining and recovering hydrologic habitat connectivity, which includes structural components related to the physical landscape, functionality of flow dynamics, and an understanding of species habitat requirements for movement, reproduction, and survival. To advance our understanding of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review of recent perspectives on hydrologic connectivity, including quantitative methods; and (2) a modeling framework to quantify the effects of restoration on hydrologic habitat connectivity. We then illustrate this approach through a case study on lateral hydrologic habitat connectivity that results from channel restoration scenarios using scenarios with different historic and climate-change flows to restore fish floodplain habitat in a med-river, the San Joaquin River, California. Case study results show that in addition to the channel alterations, higher flows are required to recover significant flooded habitat area, especially given reductions in flows expected under climate change. These types of studies will help the planning for restoration of hydrologic habitat connectivity in med-rivers, a critical step for mediterranean species recovery." (Merenlender, A. M. and M. K. Matella, 2013, Hydrobiologia) (Published February 22, 2013)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted May 30, 2017)

 

How Rising Seas and Coastal Storms Drowned the U.S. Flood Insurance Program

News article How Rising Seas and Coastal Storms Drowned the U.S. Flood Insurance Program (Published May 23, 2017)
Source: Yale Environment 360
Climate Change Topics: Sea-Level and Flood Risks: FEMA or Insurance Industry Responses /
(Posted May 25, 2017)

 

Sea level rise accelerating nearly 3x faster than during 20th century

News article Sea level rise accelerating nearly 3x faster than during 20th century
Related Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/05/16/1616007114.abstract
(Published May 24, 2017)
Source: USA Today
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted May 24, 2017)

 

Study: Western U.S. Snowpack Could Decline 60 Percent by 2040

News article Study: Western U.S. Snowpack Could Decline 60 Percent by 2040 (Published May 24, 2017)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted May 24, 2017)

 

Reassessment of 20th century global mean sea level rise

Report Reassessment of 20th century global mean sea level rise - "Estimates of global mean sea level (GMSL) before the advent of satellite altimetry vary widely, mainly because of the uneven coverage and limited temporal sampling of tide gauge records, which track local sea level rather than the global mean. Here we introduce an approach that combines recent advances in solid Earth and geoid corrections for individual tide gauges with improved knowledge about their geographical representation of ocean internal variability. Our assessment yields smaller trends before 1990 than previously reported, leading to a larger overall acceleration; identifies three major explanations for differences with previous estimates; and reconciles observational GMSL estimates with the sum of individually modeled contributions from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 database for the entire 20th century." (Dangendorf, S., et al., 2017, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) (Published May 22, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted May 24, 2017)

 

Extreme Sea Level Rise and the Stakes for America

Report Extreme Sea Level Rise and the Stakes for America - "Should a newly published sea level rise scenario come to pass, hundreds of American landmarks, neighborhoods, towns and cities would be submerged this century, at least in the absence of engineering massive, costly and unprecedented defenses and relocating major infrastructure. Ocean waters would cover land currently home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property. This extreme rise scenario, considered unlikely but increasingly plausible, was published together with other projections in a technical report by the National and Oceanic Atmospheric Administration in January. NOAA added 'extreme' as a new sea level category in the publication, supplementing high, intermediate and low categories that have also been used in past reports. The new term reflects recent research suggesting that some parts of the Antarctic ice sheet may begin to collapse much sooner than scientists had previously anticipated, particularly if ongoing emissions of heat-trapping gases like carbon dioxide and methane remain high. The extreme scenario would mean roughly 10 to 12 feet of sea level rise by 2100, depending on location, for all coastal states but Alaska — a significant departure above the global average projection (just over 8 feet). Detailed local projections are available from NOAA." An interactive map allows users to search for a place and see the extent of sea level rise. (Published April 26, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted May 24, 2017)

 

Climate change taking toll on clarity of Lake Tahoe water

News article Climate change taking toll on clarity of Lake Tahoe water (Published May 23, 2017)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water quality /
(Posted May 23, 2017)

 

Rising sea levels could mean twice as much flood risk in Los Angeles and other coastal cities

News article Rising sea levels could mean twice as much flood risk in Los Angeles and other coastal cities
Related Link: http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01362-7
(Published May 19, 2017)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 19, 2017)

 

Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise

Report Doubling of coastal flooding frequency within decades due to sea-level rise - "Global climate change drives sea-level rise, increasing the frequency of coastal flooding. In most coastal regions, the amount of sea-level rise occurring over years to decades is significantly smaller than normal ocean-level fluctuations caused by tides, waves, and storm surge. However, even gradual sea-level rise can rapidly increase the frequency and severity of coastal flooding. So far, global-scale estimates of increased coastal flooding due to sea-level rise have not considered elevated water levels due to waves, and thus underestimate the potential impact. Here we use extreme value theory to combine sea-level projections with wave, tide, and storm surge models to estimate increases in coastal flooding on a continuous global scale. We find that regions with limited water-level variability, i.e., short-tailed flood-level distributions, located mainly in the Tropics, will experience the largest increases in flooding frequency. The 10 to 20 cm of sea-level rise expected no later than 2050 will more than double the frequency of extreme water-level events in the Tropics, impairing the developing economies of equatorial coastal cities and the habitability of low-lying Pacific island nations." (Vitousek, S., et al., 2017, Scientific Reports) (Published May 18, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 19, 2017)

 

Dams are major driver of global environmental change

News article Dams are major driver of global environmental change (Published May 17, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Dams and reservoirs /
(Posted May 18, 2017)

 

Climate change: Extreme rainfall will vary between regions

News article Climate change: Extreme rainfall will vary between regions (Published May 15, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted May 18, 2017)

 

San Jose City Council approves new community choice energy plan, the largest in California

News article San Jose City Council approves new community choice energy plan, the largest in California (Published May 17, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) /
(Posted May 17, 2017)

 

State of the Salmonids II: Fish in Hot Water: Status, threats and solutions for California salmon, steelhead, and trout

Report State of the Salmonids II: Fish in Hot Water: Status, threats and solutions for California salmon, steelhead, and trout - "At the current rate, 45% of California salmonids are likely to be extinct in the next 50 years. This includes 11 of 21 anadromous species (52%) and 3 of 10 inland species (30%). In 100 years, 23 of the remaining 31 species (74%) are likely to be extinct if present conditions continue. . . Climate change is the major, overarching threat affecting salmonids in California. This report takes a comprehensive look at each salmonid and weighs, among other things, the impact of climate change and 15 other human-caused threats. Along with the detailed status of each fish, you'll also find our plan to return them to resilience and an outline of CalTrout's work that is already underway to get them there." (California Trout) Keywords: SOS II. (Published May 16, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted May 17, 2017)

 

NOAA Western Region Climate Service Providers Database

Report NOAA Western Region Climate Service Providers Database - "Looking for expert assistance on climate issues but unsure where to start? The Climate Services Provider Database is a directory of climate service providers in the Western U.S. You can search the site for the type of information or service you're seeking, such as workshops, decision support tools, vulnerability assessments, training and education, etc. You can also search by geographic area or sector served to find which provider(s) serve that area. Once you find a match, please visit the provider's website or contact them directly for more information." (Published May 9, 2017)
Source: United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Agriculture / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Energy management and conservation / Global issues, human impacts / Models and Tools / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Research / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Wildfires /
(Posted May 17, 2017)

 

Climate change is shrinking the West's water supply

News article Climate change is shrinking the West's water supply (Published May 15, 2017)
Source: High Country News
Climate Change Topics: Groundwater / Streamflow / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted May 15, 2017)

 

Community Choice Energy plan will be good for San Jose and consumers (Editorial)

News article Community Choice Energy plan will be good for San Jose and consumers (Editorial) (Published May 12, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) /
(Posted May 15, 2017)

 

Depletion and response of deep groundwater to climate-induced pumping variability

Report Depletion and response of deep groundwater to climate-induced pumping variability - "Groundwater constitutes a critical component of our water resources. Widespread groundwater level declines have occurred in the USA over recent decades, including in regions not typically considered water stressed, such as areas of the Northwest and mid-Atlantic Coast. This loss of water storage reflects extraction rates that exceed natural recharge and capture. Here, we explore recent changes in the groundwater levels of deep aquifers from wells across the USA, and their relation to indices of interannual to decadal climate variability and to annual precipitation. We show that groundwater level changes correspond to selected global climate variations. Although climate-induced variations of deep aquifer natural recharge are expected to have multi-year time lags, we find that deep groundwater levels respond to climate over timescales of less than one year. In irrigated areas, the annual response to local precipitation in the deepest wells may reflect climate-induced pumping variability. An understanding of how the human response to drought through pumping leads to deep groundwater changes is critical to manage the impacts of interannual to decadal and longer climate variability on the nation’s water resources." (Russo, T. A. and U. Lall, 2017, Nature Geoscience) (Published January 23, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Groundwater /
(Posted May 15, 2017)

 

Rapid escalation of coastal flood exposure in US municipalities from sea level rise

Report Rapid escalation of coastal flood exposure in US municipalities from sea level rise - "Rising sea levels are increasing the exposure of populations and infrastructure to coastal flooding. While earlier studies estimate magnitudes of future exposure or project rates of sea level rise, here, we estimate growth rates of exposure, likely to be a key factor in how effectively coastal communities can adapt. These rates may not correlate well with sea level rise rates due to varying patterns of topography and development. We integrate exposure assessments based on LiDAR elevation data with extreme flood event distributions and sea level rise projections to compute the expected annual exposure of population, housing, roads, and property value in 327 medium-to-large coastal municipalities circumscribing the contiguous USA, and identify those localities that could experience rapid exposure growth sometime this century. We define a rate threshold of 0.25% additive increase in expected annual exposure per year, based on its rarity of present-day exceedance. With unchecked carbon emissions under Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5, the number of cities exceeding the threshold reaches 33 (18-59, 90% CI) by 2050 and 90 (22-196) by 2100, including the cities of Boston and Miami. Sharp cuts under RCP 2.6 limit the end-of-century total to 28 (12-105), versus a baseline of 7 cities in 2000. The methods and results presented here offer a new way to illustrate the consequences of different emission scenarios or mitigation efforts, and locally assess the urgency of coastal adaptation measures." (Kulp, S. and B. H. Strauss, 2017, Climatic Change) (Published May 10, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted May 10, 2017)

 

Safeguarding California Plan: 2017 Update: California's Climate Adaptation Strategy: Draft Report

Report Safeguarding California Plan: 2017 Update: California's Climate Adaptation Strategy: Draft Report - State government strategies for water, emergency management, energy, land use and community development, public health, transportation, agriculture, biodiversity and habitat, forests, and the ocean and coast. (Published May 8, 2017)
Source: California. Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Agriculture / California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Energy management and conservation / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted May 10, 2017)

 

Managing biodiversity under climate change: challenges, frameworks, and tools for adaptation

Report Managing biodiversity under climate change: challenges, frameworks, and tools for adaptation - "The myriad challenges facing biodiversity under climate change are re?ected in the challenges facing managers planning for these impacts. An ever-expanding number of recommendations and tools for climate change adaptation exist to aid managers in these efforts, yet navigating these various resources can lead to information overload and paralysis in decision-making. Here we provide a synthesis of the key considerations, approaches, and available tools for integrating climate change adaptation into management plans. We discuss principal elements in climate change adaptation -- incorporating uncertainty through scenario planning and adaptive management -- and review three leading frameworks for incorporating climate change adaptation into place-based biodiversity conservation planning. Finally, we identify the following key questions needed for long- term conservation planning and review the associated tools and techniques needed to address them: (1) How is the climate projected to change in my study area?; (2) How are non-climatic stressors projected to change?; (3) How vulnerable are species to climate change impacts?; (4) How are species ranges likely to respond?; and (5) How are management strategies expected to affect outcomes? In doing so, we aim to aid natural resource managers in navigating the burgeoning field of climate change adaptation planning and provide managers a roadmap for managing biodiversity under climate change." (Abrahms, B., et al., 2017, Biodiversity and Conservation) (Published May 6, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted May 10, 2017)

 

Planning and Management: Programmatic Response to Climate Change and Water

Report Planning and Management: Programmatic Response to Climate Change and Water - EPA National Water Program repsonses to climate change, 2012 to date -- highlights of progress, workplans, implementation plans, strategies. (Published January 17, 2017)
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Water quality / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted May 9, 2017)

 

Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and What You Can Learn from Others

Report Climate Resilience: What to Expect, How to Prepare, and What You Can Learn from Others - "This webcast will share findings from the most recent National Climate Assessment report (2014) concerning climate change and water resources. It will also discuss a new resource from EPA to help communities prepare for climate change impacts. The workbook Being Prepared for Climate Change: A Workbook for Developing Risk-Based Adaptation Plans helps users to create a vulnerability assessment and identify adaptation actions to address their vulnerabilities. The webcast will highlight how the workbook has been used in a pilot project with the San Juan Bay Estuary program. Take home messages from the webcast include: climate impacts on U.S. water resources, risk-based adaptation planning and decision-making tools and lessons learned from the pilot project." Watershed Academy. (1 hour, 49 min. video) (Published October 29, 2014)
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Video Training / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted May 9, 2017)

 

Natural Resources Agency Seeks Public Comment on Update to the State's Climate Adaptation Plan

News article Natural Resources Agency Seeks Public Comment on Update to the State's Climate Adaptation Plan (Published May 8, 2017)
Source: California Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide /
(Posted May 8, 2017)

 

Can state run on sun and wind alone? California weighs aggressive climate change measures

News article Can state run on sun and wind alone? California weighs aggressive climate change measures (Published May 4, 2017)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Renewable energy /
(Posted May 4, 2017)

 

Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost. Summary for Policy-makers

Report Snow, Water, Ice and Permafrost. Summary for Policy-makers - Details changes taking place in the Arctic, including implications for global sea-level rise. (Arctic Council) (Published April 10, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Sea and Polar ice / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 3, 2017)

 

A high-end sea level rise probabilistic projection including rapid Antarctic ice sheet mass loss

Report A high-end sea level rise probabilistic projection including rapid Antarctic ice sheet mass loss - "The potential for break-up of Antarctic ice shelves by hydrofracturing and following ice cliff instability might be important for future ice dynamics. One recent study suggests that the Antarctic ice sheet could lose a lot more mass during the 21st century than previously thought. This increased mass-loss is found to strongly depend on the emission scenario and thereby on global temperature change. We investigate the impact of this new information on high-end global sea level rise projections by developing a probabilistic process-based method. It is shown that uncertainties in the projections increase when including the temperature dependence of Antarctic mass loss and the uncertainty in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) model ensemble. Including these new uncertainties we provide probability density functions for the high-end distribution of total global mean sea level in 2100 conditional on emission scenario. These projections provide a probabilistic context to previous extreme sea level scenarios developed for adaptation purposes." (Le Bars, D., et al., 2017, Environmental Research Letters) (Published April 3, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Sea and Polar ice / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 3, 2017)

 

Liccardo: Let consumers choose to use clean energy and, by the way, save money (Opinion)

News article Liccardo: Let consumers choose to use clean energy and, by the way, save money (Opinion) (Published April 30, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) /
(Posted May 2, 2017)

 

Reversing Climate Change? California Author Offers 100 Reasons to Hope

News article Reversing Climate Change? California Author Offers 100 Reasons to Hope (Published May 1, 2017)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted May 1, 2017)

 

EPA website removes climate science site from public view after two decades

News article EPA website removes climate science site from public view after two decades (Published April 29, 2017)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted May 1, 2017)

 

Scientists keep upping their projections for how much the oceans will rise this century

News article Scientists keep upping their projections for how much the oceans will rise this century
Related Link: http://www.amap.no/documents/doc/Snow-Water-Ice-and-Permafrost.-Summary-for-Policy-makers/1532
(Published April 26, 2017)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted April 27, 2017)

 

California Should Prepare for Rapid Loss of Antarctic Ice Sheet, OPC Science Report States

News article California Should Prepare for Rapid Loss of Antarctic Ice Sheet, OPC Science Report States (Published April 26, 2017)
Source: Association of California Water Agencies
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea and Polar ice / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 27, 2017)

 

Rising Seas Claiming California's Coast Faster Than Scientists Imagined

News article Rising Seas Claiming California's Coast Faster Than Scientists Imagined
Related Link: http://www.opc.ca.gov/webmaster/ftp/pdf/docs/rising-seas-in-california-an-update-on-sea-level-rise-science.pdf
(Published April 26, 2017)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 27, 2017)

 

Climate change is making algal blooms worse

News article Climate change is making algal blooms worse (Published April 25, 2017)
Source: Nature
Climate Change Topics: Water quality /
(Posted April 26, 2017)

 

Sea levels could rise by more than three metres, shows new study

News article Sea levels could rise by more than three metres, shows new study
Related Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aa6512
(Published April 26, 2017)
Source: Phys.Org
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted April 26, 2017)

 

Extreme weather linked to greenhouse gases, global warming, Stanford study says

News article Extreme weather linked to greenhouse gases, global warming, Stanford study says
Related Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2017/04/18/1618082114
(Published April 25, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted April 25, 2017)

 

Quantifying the influence of global warming on unprecedented extreme climate events

Report Quantifying the influence of global warming on unprecedented extreme climate events - "Extreme climate events have increased in many regions. Efforts to test the influence of global warming on individual events have also increased, raising the possibility of operational, real-time, single-event attribution. We apply four attribution metrics to four climate variables at each available point on a global grid. We find that historical global warming has increased the severity and probability of the hottest monthly and daily events at more than 80% of the observed area and has increased the probability of the driest and wettest events at approximately half of the observed area. Our results suggest that scientifically durable operational attribution is possible but they also highlight the importance of carefully diagnosing and testing the physical causes of individual events." (Diffenbaugh, N. S., et al., 2017, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) (Published April 24, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted April 25, 2017)

 

How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system?

Report How can climate change and engineered water conveyance affect sediment dynamics in the San Francisco Bay-Delta system? - "Suspended sediment concentration is an important estuarine health indicator. Estuarine ecosystems rely on the maintenance of habitat conditions, which are changing due to direct human impact and climate change. This study aims to evaluate the impact of climate change relative to engineering measures on estuarine fine sediment dynamics and sediment budgets. We use the highly engineered San Francisco Bay-Delta system as a case study. We apply a process-based modeling approach (Delft3D-FM) to assess the changes in hydrodynamics and sediment dynamics resulting from climate change and engineering scenarios. The scenarios consider a direct human impact (shift in water pumping location), climate change (sea level rise and suspended sediment concentration decrease), and abrupt disasters (island flooding, possibly as the results of an earthquake). Levee failure has the largest impact on the hydrodynamics of the system. Reduction in sediment input from the watershed has the greatest impact on turbidity levels, which are key to primary production and define habitat conditions for endemic species. Sea level rise leads to more sediment suspension and a net sediment export if little room for accommodation is left in the system due to continuous engineering works. Mitigation measures like levee reinforcement are effective for addressing direct human impacts, but less effective for a persistent, widespread, and increasing threat like sea level rise. Progressive adaptive mitigation measures to the changes in sediment and flow dynamics resulting from sea level rise may be a more effective strategy. Our approach shows that a validated process-based model is a useful tool to address long-term (decades to centuries) changes in sediment dynamics in highly engineered estuarine systems. In addition, our modeling approach provides a useful basis for long-term, process-based studies addressing ecosystem dynamics and health." (Achete, F., et al., 2017, Climatic Change) (Published April 24, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Bay Area and Delta / Sea level rise / Water quality /
(Posted April 24, 2017)

 

When Rising Seas Transform Risk Into Certainty (flood insurance)

News article When Rising Seas Transform Risk Into Certainty (flood insurance) (Published April 23, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise / Sea-Level and Flood Risks: FEMA or Insurance Industry Responses /
(Posted April 19, 2017)

 

The new normal: California's climate in crisis (360 story)

News article The new normal: California's climate in crisis (360 story) (Published April 18, 2017)
Source: Peninsula Press
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Flooding /
(Posted April 19, 2017)

 

Study on impact of climate change on snowpack loss in Western U.S.

News article Study on impact of climate change on snowpack loss in Western U.S.
Related Link: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14996
(Published April 18, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 19, 2017)

 

Large near-term projected snowpack loss over the western United States

Report Large near-term projected snowpack loss over the western United States - "Peak runoff in streams and rivers of the western United States is strongly influenced by melting of accumulated mountain snowpack. A significant decline in this resource has a direct connection to streamflow, with substantial economic and societal impacts. Observations and reanalyses indicate that between the 1980s and 2000s, there was a 10–20% loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the region’s snowpack. Here we show that this loss is consistent with results from a large ensemble of climate simulations forced with natural and anthropogenic changes, but is inconsistent with simulations forced by natural changes alone. A further loss of up to 60% is projected within the next 30 years. Uncertainties in loss estimates depend on the size and the rate of response to continued anthropogenic forcing and the magnitude and phasing of internal decadal variability. The projected losses have serious implications for the hydropower, municipal and agricultural sectors in the region." (Fyfe, J. C., et al., 2017, Nature Communications) (Published April 18, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 19, 2017)

 

'Detergent' molecules may be driving fluctuations in atmospheric methane concentrations

News article 'Detergent' molecules may be driving fluctuations in atmospheric methane concentrations (Published April 17, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases /
(Posted April 18, 2017)

 

Probabilistic 21st and 22nd century sea-level projections at a global network of tide-gauge sites

Report Probabilistic 21st and 22nd century sea-level projections at a global network of tide-gauge sites - "Sea-level rise due to both climate change and non-climatic factors threatens coastal settlements, infrastructure, and ecosystems. Projections of mean global sea-level (GSL) rise provide insufficient information to plan adaptive responses; local decisions require local projections that accommodate different risk tolerances and time frames and that can be linked to storm surge projections. Here we present a global set of local sea-level (LSL) projections to inform decisions on timescales ranging from the coming decades through the 22nd century. We provide complete probability distributions, informed by a combination of expert community assessment, expert elicitation, and process modeling. Between the years 2000 and 2100, we project a very likely (90% probability) GSL rise of 0.5-1.2?m under representative concentration pathway (RCP) 8.5, 0.4-0.9?m under RCP 4.5, and 0.3-0.8?m under RCP 2.6. Site-to-site differences in LSL projections are due to varying non-climatic background uplift or subsidence, oceanographic effects, and spatially variable responses of the geoid and the lithosphere to shrinking land ice. The Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) constitutes a growing share of variance in GSL and LSL projections. In the global average and at many locations, it is the dominant source of variance in late 21st century projections, though at some sites oceanographic processes contribute the largest share throughout the century. LSL rise dramatically reshapes flood risk, greatly increasing the expected number of '1-in-10' and '1-in-100' year events." (Kopp, et al., 2014, Earth's Future) (Published August 21, 2014)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted April 18, 2017)

 

Seeing the forest for the trees: What one oak tells us about climate change

News article Seeing the forest for the trees: What one oak tells us about climate change (Published April 17, 2017)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted April 17, 2017)

 

Report: We Can't Stop Sea Level Rise, Only Slow it Down

News article Report: We Can't Stop Sea Level Rise, Only Slow it Down (Published April 14, 2017)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 17, 2017)

 

Sea-level rise in California could be catastrophic, study says

News article Sea-level rise in California could be catastrophic, study says
Related Link: http://www.opc.ca.gov/webmaster/ftp/pdf/docs/rising-seas-in-california-an-update-on-sea-level-rise-science.pdf
(Published April 13, 2017)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 13, 2017)

 

Climate Experts Release Latest Science on Sea Level Rise Projections to Support California Policy Guidance

News article Climate Experts Release Latest Science on Sea Level Rise Projections to Support California Policy Guidance
Related Link: http://www.opc.ca.gov/webmaster/ftp/pdf/docs/rising-seas-in-california-an-update-on-sea-level-rise-science.pdf
(Published April 12, 2017)
Source: California Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 12, 2017)

 

From extreme drought to record rain: Why California's drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse

News article From extreme drought to record rain: Why California's drought-to-deluge cycle is getting worse (Published April 12, 2017)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted April 12, 2017)

 

Rising Seas in California: An Update on Sea-Level Rise Science

Report Rising Seas in California: An Update on Sea-Level Rise Science - Key findings: 1. Scientific understanding of sea-level rise is advancing at a rapid pace; 2. The direction of sea level change is clear; 3. The rate of ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is incresing; 4. New scientific evidence has highlighted the potential for extreme sea-level rise; 5. Probabilities of specific sea-level increases can inform decisions; 6. Current policy decisions are shaping our coastal future; 7. Waiting for scientific certainty is neither a safe nor prudent option. (Published April 12, 2017)
Source: California. Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 12, 2017)

 

Marin Bay Waterfront Adaptation and Vulnerability Evaluation (BayWAVE)

Report Marin Bay Waterfront Adaptation and Vulnerability Evaluation (BayWAVE) - "BayWAVE is a focused vulnerability assessment (VA) of the eastern Marin shoreline from the Golden Gate Bridge to the county line north of Novato. The fundamental goal of the BayWAVE project is to increase awareness and preparation for future SLR [sea-level rise] impacts by using this coordinated, multi-jurisdictional assessment." (Marin Shoreline Sea Level Rise Vulnerability Assessment) (Published April 4, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 12, 2017)

 

A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration

Report A systematic review of ecological attributes that confer resilience to climate change in environmental restoration - "We identified 45 attributes explicitly related to climate change and classified them as individual- (9), population- (6), community- (7), ecosystem- (7), or process-level attributes (16). Individual studies defined resilience as resistance to change or recovery from disturbance, and only a few studies explicitly included both concepts in their definition of resilience. We found that individual and population attributes generally are suited to species- or habitat-specific restoration actions and applicable at the population scale. Community attributes are better suited to habitat-specific restoration at the site scale, or system-wide restoration at the ecosystem scale. Ecosystem and process attributes vary considerably in their type and applicability. We summarize these relationships in a decision support table and provide three example applications to illustrate how these classifications can be used to prioritize climate change resilience attributes for specific restoration actions. We suggest that (1) including resilience as an explicit planning objective could increase the success of restoration projects, (2) considering the ecological context and focal scale of a restoration action is essential in choosing appropriate resilience attributes, and (3) certain ecological attributes, such as diversity and connectivity, are more commonly considered to confer resilience because they apply to a wide variety of species and ecosystems. We propose that identifying sources of ecological resilience is a critical step in restoring ecosystems in a changing climate." (Timpane-Padgham, B. L., T. Beechie, and T. Klinger, 2017, PLOS One) (Published March 16, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted April 12, 2017)

 

Scientists Fear Climate Data Gap as Trump Aims at Satellites

News article Scientists Fear Climate Data Gap as Trump Aims at Satellites (Published April 11, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. / Research /
(Posted April 11, 2017)

 

Living in the gray zone: Climate change and the California drought

News article Living in the gray zone: Climate change and the California drought (Published April 8, 2017)
Source: Peninsula Press
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought /
(Posted April 10, 2017)

 

State appeals court upholds California's cap-and-trade program

News article State appeals court upholds California's cap-and-trade program (Published April 7, 2017)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: AB 32 / California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted April 7, 2017)

 

California's conservative farmers tackle climate change, in their own way

News article California's conservative farmers tackle climate change, in their own way (Published April 5, 2017)
Source: Christian Science Monitor
Climate Change Topics: Agriculture / California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 5, 2017)

 

California's 'new' environmentalism: Toxic air, tainted water driving climate-change debate

News article California's 'new' environmentalism: Toxic air, tainted water driving climate-change debate (Published April 2, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted April 3, 2017)

 

Climate change: Trump tosses Obama's 'clean' energy plan, but little impact on California laws

News article Climate change: Trump tosses Obama's 'clean' energy plan, but little impact on California laws (Published March 29, 2017)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: AB 32 / California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted March 29, 2017)

 

How California can hit housing and greenhouse emission goals

News article How California can hit housing and greenhouse emission goals (Published March 28, 2017)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation /
(Posted March 28, 2017)

 

Climate change: 'human fingerprint' found on global extreme weather

News article Climate change: 'human fingerprint' found on global extreme weather (Published March 27, 2017)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 28, 2017)

 

One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor

News article One of the most troubling ideas about climate change just found new evidence in its favor (Published March 28, 2017)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts /
(Posted March 27, 2017)

 

California's Wild Climate to Become More Volatile as Temperatures Rise

News article California's Wild Climate to Become More Volatile as Temperatures Rise (Published March 24, 2017)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted March 24, 2017)

 

The Key Role of Heavy Precipitation Events in Climate Model Disagreements of Future Annual Precipitation Changes in California

Report The Key Role of Heavy Precipitation Events in Climate Model Disagreements of Future Annual Precipitation Changes in California - "Climate model simulations disagree on whether future precipitation will increase or decrease over California, which has impeded efforts to anticipate and adapt to human-induced climate change. This disagreement is explored in terms of daily precipitation frequency and intensity. It is found that divergent model projections of changes in the incidence of rare heavy (>60 mm day-1) daily precipitation events explain much of the model disagreement on annual time scales, yet represent only 0.3% of precipitating days and 9% of annual precipitation volume. Of the 25 downscaled model projections examined here, 21 agree that precipitation frequency will decrease by the 2060s, with a mean reduction of 6-14 days yr-1. This reduces California's mean annual precipitation by about 5.7%. Partly offsetting this, 16 of the 25 projections agree that daily precipitation intensity will increase, which accounts for a model average 5.3% increase in annual precipitation. Between these conflicting tendencies, 12 projections show drier annual conditions by the 2060s and 13 show wetter." (Pierce, D. W., et al., 2013, Journal of Climate) (Published August 6, 2013)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Downscaled Climate Model Data / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 22, 2017)

 

Creating Climate projections to support the 4th California Climate Assessment

Report Creating Climate projections to support the 4th California Climate Assessment - "We have generated daily, 1/16 degree spatial resolution (about 6 km, or 3.7 miles) climate projections over the state of California to support the 4th California Climate Assessment. We started with data from 32 coarse-resolution global climate models (GCMs) from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project, version 5 (CMIP5) archive, which is the most recent archive of models developed for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports. The data cover 1950-2005 for the historical period, and include two future climate projections for the period 2006-2100, one using medium (Representative Concentration Pathway [RCP] 4.5) and one using high (RCP 8.5) greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions scenarios. We removed systematic errors from the GCMs via bias correction and then downscaled the daily precipitation, minimum and maximum temperature data from the coarse-resolution GCMs to the 1/16 degree latitude-longitude grid using a statistical method called Localized Constructed Analogs (LOCA). The downscaled fields were applied to the VIC land surface/hydrological model to develop additional variables of interest to climate impact studies, including snow cover, soil moisture, runoff, water loss from plants, surface heat fluxes, etc. The final data set of 32 models is voluminous (~40 TB), so recommendations are included for selecting a subset of models if the full set cannot be accommodated. A subset of 10 models identified by the California Department of Water Resources as having a good simulation of California’s climate is described. For impact studies that cannot accommodate data from 10 models, a further reduced set of 4 models that substantially cover the results from the set of 10 is derived." (Pierce, D. W., D. R. Cahen, L. Dehann) (Published June 13, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Downscaling, How to / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 22, 2017)

 

Probabilistic estimates of future changes in California temperature and precipitation using statistical and dynamical downscaling

Report Probabilistic estimates of future changes in California temperature and precipitation using statistical and dynamical downscaling - "Sixteen global general circulation models were used to develop probabilistic projections of temperature (T) and precipitation (P) changes over California by the 2060s. The global models were downscaled with two statistical techniques and three nested dynamical regional climate models, although not all global models were downscaled with all techniques. Both monthly and daily timescale changes in T and P are addressed, the latter being important for a range of applications in energy use, water management, and agriculture. The T changes tend to agree more across downscaling techniques than the P changes. Year-to-year natural internal climate variability is roughly of similar magnitude to the projected T changes. In the monthly average, July temperatures shift enough that that the hottest July found in any simulation over the historical period becomes a modestly cool July in the future period. Januarys as cold as any found in the historical period are still found in the 2060s, but the median and maximum monthly average temperatures increase notably. Annual and seasonal P changes are small compared to interannual or intermodel variability. However, the annual change is composed of seasonally varying changes that are themselves much larger, but tend to cancel in the annual mean. Winters show modestly wetter conditions in the North of the state, while spring and autumn show less precipitation. The dynamical downscaling techniques project increasing precipitation in the Southeastern part of the state, which is influenced by the North American monsoon, a feature that is not captured by the statistical downscaling." (Pierce, D. W., et al., 2013, Climate Dynamics) (Published March 30, 2012)
Climate Change Topics: Downscaled Climate Model Data / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted March 22, 2017)

 

Heavy California rains par for the course for climate change

News article Heavy California rains par for the course for climate change (Published March 21, 2017)
Source: Stanford University News
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 21, 2017)

 

Reconsider the impact of trees on water cycles and climate, scientists say

News article Reconsider the impact of trees on water cycles and climate, scientists say (Published March 20, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted March 21, 2017)

 

Review of the Draft Climate Science Special Report

Report Review of the Draft Climate Science Special Report - "The United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) is moving towards a sustained assessment process that allows for more fluid and consistent integration of scientific knowledge into the mandated quadrennial National Climate Assessment. As part of this process, the USGCRP is developing the Climate Science Special Report (CSSR), a technical report that details the current state-of-science relating to climate change and its physical impacts. The CSSR is intended to focus on climate change in the United States and to inform future USGCRP products. Review of the Draft Climate Science Special Report assesses whether the draft CSSR accurately presents the scientific literature in an understandable, transparent and traceable way; whether the CSSR authors handled the data, analyses, and statistical approaches in an appropriate manner; and the effectiveness of the report in conveying the information clearly for the intended audience. This report provides recommendations for how the draft CSSR could be strengthened." (Published March 14, 2017)
Source: National Academies
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Flooding / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 21, 2017)

 

Trump's budget plan for NASA focuses on studying space, not climate change

News article Trump's budget plan for NASA focuses on studying space, not climate change (Published March 17, 2017)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. / Research /
(Posted March 20, 2017)

 

How California is preparing for a future full of extreme weather

News article How California is preparing for a future full of extreme weather (Published March 16, 2017)
Source: PBS NewsHour
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 17, 2017)

 

Drought may release carbon from hydroelectric reservoirs

News article Drought may release carbon from hydroelectric reservoirs (Published March 13, 2017)
Source: Environmental Research Web
Climate Change Topics: Dams and reservoirs / Drought / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases /
(Posted March 14, 2017)

 

California water regulators expand focus on climate change

News article California water regulators expand focus on climate change (Published March 10, 2017)
Source: Desert Sun
Climate Change Topics: AB 32 / Adaptation / California: Statewide / Drought / Flooding / Water quality / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 10, 2017)

 

E.P.A. Chief Doubts Consensus View of Climate Change

News article E.P.A. Chief Doubts Consensus View of Climate Change (Published March 10, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. / Skepticism /
(Posted March 10, 2017)

 

Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought

Report Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought - "Sierra Nevada climate and snowpack is simulated during the period of extreme drought from 2011 to 2015 and compared to an identical simulation except for the removal of 20th century anthropogenic warming. Anthropogenic warming reduced average snowpack levels by 25%, with mid-to-low elevations experiencing reductions between 26-43%. In terms of event frequency, return periods associated with anomalies in 4-year April 1 SWE are estimated to have doubled, and possibly quadrupled, due to past warming. We also estimate effects of future anthropogenic warmth on snowpack during a drought similar to that of 2011-2015. Further snowpack declines of 60-85% are expected, depending on emissions scenario. The return periods associated with future snowpack levels are estimated to range from millennia to much longer. Therefore, past human emissions of greenhouse gases are already negatively impacting statewide water resources during drought, and much more severe impacts are likely to be inevitable." (Berg, N. and A. Hall, 2017, Geophysical Research Letters) (Published March 9, 2017)
Source: University of California, Los Angeles
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 10, 2017)

 

Local Solutions Report: Identifying and meeting the needs of local communities adapting to climate change

Report Local Solutions Report: Identifying and meeting the needs of local communities adapting to climate change - "This report coalesces and analyzes data from a range of sources, including the Center’s Local Solutions Survey, local decision-makers’ evaluations of capacity-building climate preparedness programs, and community need statements. We offer recommendations to inform priorities for developing actionable climate adaptation data sets, facilitating regional collaboration and adaptation action, public policy, government budget setting, and private sector funding and investments." (Published November 2, 2016)
Source: Center for Climate Preparedness and Community Resilience (Antioch Univ. New England)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation /
(Posted March 10, 2017)

 

Comprehensive Response to Climate Change

Report Comprehensive Response to Climate Change - Resolution adopted by the State Water Board March 7, 2017. Outlines actions the Board will take in the areas of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, water conservation and efficiency, recycled water, storm water, energy efficiency and renewable energy, improving ecosystem resiliency, and responding to climate change impacts. (Published March 7, 2017)
Source: California. State Water Resources Control Board
Climate Change Topics: AB 32 / Adaptation / California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Energy management and conservation / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Renewable energy / Water quality / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 9, 2017)

 

E.P.A. Head Stacks Agency With Climate Change Skeptics

News article E.P.A. Head Stacks Agency With Climate Change Skeptics (Published March 8, 2017)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Skepticism /
(Posted March 8, 2017)

 

Return to Climate Change Portal

Links on these pages go to sites of interest to the staff of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. Listing a site on these pages does not constitute an endorsement by the District.

Created and maintained by Bob Teeter, District Librarian; organized by Sarah Young