print Font Size: small font medium font large font

Climate Change Blog

 

California's Future

Report California's Future - Summaries of the issues facing the state, including water and climate change. (Updated January 2017) (Published January 6, 2017)
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 17, 2017)

 

California's Future: Climate Change

Report California's Future: Climate Change - Six-page summary of climate change issues in the state. (Updated Jan. 2017) (Published January 6, 2017)
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Sea level rise / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 17, 2017)

 

Projected Impacts of Climate, Urbanization, Water Management, and Wetland Restoration on Waterbird Habitat in California's Central Valley

Report Projected Impacts of Climate, Urbanization, Water Management, and Wetland Restoration on Waterbird Habitat in California's Central Valley - "Future effects of urban development, changes in water supply management, and precipitation and air temperature related to global climate change on area of waterbird habitat in the Central Valley are uncertain, yet potentially substantial. Therefore, we modeled area of waterbird habitats for 17 climate, urbanization, water supply management, and wetland restoration scenarios for years 2006-2099 using a water resources and scenario modeling framework. Planned wetland restoration largely compensated for adverse effects of climate, urbanization, and water supply management changes on habitat areas through 2065, but fell short thereafter for all except one scenario. Projected habitat reductions due to climate models were more frequent and greater than under the recent historical climate and their magnitude increased through time. After 2065, area of waterbird habitat in all scenarios that included severe warmer, drier climate was projected to be >15% less than in the 'existing' landscape most years. The greatest reduction in waterbird habitat occurred in scenarios that combined warmer, drier climate and plausible water supply management options affecting priority and delivery of water available for waterbird habitats. This scenario modeling addresses the complexity and uncertainties in the Central Valley landscape, use and management of related water supplies, and climate to inform waterbird habitat conservation and other resource management planning. Results indicate that increased wetland restoration and additional conservation and climate change adaptation strategies may be warranted to maintain habitat adequate to support waterbirds in the Central Valley." (Matchett, E. L. and J. P. Fleskes, 2017, PLOS) (Published January 9, 2017)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted January 17, 2017)

 

Californians' Views on Climate Change

News article Californians' Views on Climate Change (Published January 10, 2017)
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted January 11, 2017)

 

New Climate Data Record Focuses on Water

News article New Climate Data Record Focuses on Water (Published January 10, 2017)
Source: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 10, 2017)

 

State Climate Summaries

Report State Climate Summaries - Data showing observed temperature, precipitation, snowpack, reservoir storage, drought, and sea level. (Published January 9, 2017)
Source: United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Downscaled Climate Model Data / Drought / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 10, 2017)

 

California Climate and Hydrology Change Graphs

Report California Climate and Hydrology Change Graphs - "This graphing tool presents climate and hydrology data values from the California Basin Characterization Model dataset plotted over time for 156 hydrologic basins (HUC-8 basins) that comprise hydrologic California." (California Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Commons) (Published )
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Downscaled Climate Model Data / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 10, 2017)

 

New California Dam Proposed to Combat Climate Change Concerns

News article New California Dam Proposed to Combat Climate Change Concerns (Published January 9, 2017)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Dams and reservoirs / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 9, 2017)

 

New State Climate Summaries Bring Local Information to You

News article New State Climate Summaries Bring Local Information to You (Published January 9, 2017)
Source: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Downscaled Climate Model Data / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Temperature /
(Posted January 9, 2017)

 

Global warming data that riled doubters is confirmed

News article Global warming data that riled doubters is confirmed (Published January 5, 2017)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: Research / Temperature /
(Posted January 5, 2017)

 

MIT scientists: Monster storms will triple in California by 2100

News article MIT scientists: Monster storms will triple in California by 2100
Related Link: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0544.1
(Published January 5, 2017)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted January 5, 2017)

 

Scientists say the global ocean circulation may be more vulnerable to shutdown than we thought

News article Scientists say the global ocean circulation may be more vulnerable to shutdown than we thought (Published January 5, 2017)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts /
(Posted January 4, 2017)

 

California Snow Levels Below Normal Despite Heavy Rains

News article California Snow Levels Below Normal Despite Heavy Rains (Published January 3, 2017)
Source: Union of Concerned Scientists
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted January 4, 2017)

 

More extreme storms ahead for California; New technique predicts frequency of heavy precipitation with global warming

News article More extreme storms ahead for California; New technique predicts frequency of heavy precipitation with global warming
Related Link: http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JCLI-D-16-0544.1
(Published January 3, 2017)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted January 4, 2017)

 

21st Century Changes in U.S. Regional Heavy Precipitation Frequency Based on Resolved Atmospheric Patterns

Report 21st Century Changes in U.S. Regional Heavy Precipitation Frequency Based on Resolved Atmospheric Patterns - "Scientists have found that extreme precipitation events in California should become more frequent as the Earth's climate warms over this century. The researchers developed a new technique that predicts the frequency of local, extreme rainfall events by identifying telltale large-scale patterns in atmospheric data." -- Science News. (Gao, X., et al., 2016, Journal of Climate) (Published December 21, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted January 4, 2017)

 

Increase in hourly precipitation extremes beyond expectations from temperature changes

Report Increase in hourly precipitation extremes beyond expectations from temperature changes - "Changes in precipitation extremes under greenhouse warming are commonly assumed to be constrained by changes in the amounts of precipitable water in the atmosphere. Global climate models generally predict only marginal changes in relative humidity, implying that the actual amount of atmospheric precipitable water scales with the water vapour content of saturation, which is governed by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. Indeed, changes in daily precipitation extremes in global climate models seem to be consistent with the 7% increase per degree of warming given by the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, but it is uncertain how general this scaling behaviour is across timescales. Here, we analyse a 99-year record of hourly precipitation observations from De Bilt, the Netherlands, and find that one-hour precipitation extremes increase twice as fast with rising temperatures as expected from the Clausius-Clapeyron relation when daily mean temperatures exceed 12 degrees C. In addition, simulations with a high-resolution regional climate model show that one-hour precipitation extremes increase at a rate close to 14% per degree of warming in large parts of Europe. Our results demonstrate that changes in short-duration precipitation extremes may well exceed expectations from the Clausius-Clapeyron relation. These short-duration extreme events can have significant impacts, such as local flooding, erosion and water damage." (Lenderink, G. and E. Van Meijgaard, 2008, Nature Geoscience) (Published July 20, 2008)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted January 4, 2017)

 

Gauging climate preparedness to inform adaptation needs: local level adaptation in drinking water quality in CA, USA

Report Gauging climate preparedness to inform adaptation needs: local level adaptation in drinking water quality in CA, USA - "Understanding resource managers’ perceptions of climate change, analytic capacity, and current adaptation activities can provide insight into what can help support adaptation processes at the local level. In California, where a major drought currently demonstrates some of the hardships that could be regularly encountered under a changing climate, we present results from a survey of drinking water utilities about the perceived threat, analytic capacity, and adaptation actions related to maintaining water quality in the face of climate change. Among surveyed utilities (n=259), awareness is high in regard to climate change occurring and its potential impacts on water quality globally, but perceived risk is lower with regard to climate impacts on local drinking water quality. Just over half of surveyed utilities report at least some adaptation activity to date. The top three variables that most strongly correlated with reported adaptation action were (1) perceived risk on global and local water quality, (2) surface water reliance, and (3) provision of other services beyond drinking water. Other tested variables significantly correlated with reported adaptation action were (4) degree of impact from the current drought and (5) communication with climate change experts. Findings highlight that smaller groundwater-reliant utilities may need the most assistance to initiate climate adaptation processes. Trusted information sources most frequently used across respondents were state government agencies, followed by colleagues in the same utilities. The finding that frequently used sources of information are similar across utilities presents a promising opportunity for training and disseminating climate information to assist those systems needing the most support." (Ekstrom, J. A., et al., 2016, Climatic Change) (Published December 23, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / California: Water/Flood Protection Districts / Drought / Water quality / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted December 28, 2016)

 

Sunnyvale municipal electricity to go 100 percent green energy

News article Sunnyvale municipal electricity to go 100 percent green energy (Published December 25, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) / Renewable energy /
(Posted December 27, 2016)

 

How Climate Change Will Affect the Future of California Water

News article How Climate Change Will Affect the Future of California Water
Related Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9pHCxNxJP0
(Published December 21, 2016)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / Drought / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Groundwater / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 21, 2016)

 

On bias correction in drought frequency analysis based on climate models

Report On bias correction in drought frequency analysis based on climate models - "Assessment of future drought characteristics based on climate models is difficult as climate models usually have bias in simulating precipitation frequency and intensity. In this study, we examine the significance of bias correction in the context of drought frequency and scenario analysis using output from climate models. In particular, we use three bias correction techniques with different emphases and complexities to investigate how they affect the results of drought frequency and severity based on climate models. The characteristics of drought are investigated using regional climate model (RCM) output from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP). The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is used to compare and forecast drought characteristics at different timescales. Systematic biases in the RCM precipitation output are corrected against the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data and the bias-corrected RCM historical simulations. Preserving mean and standard deviation of NARR precipitation is essential in drought frequency analysis. The results demonstrate that bias correction significantly decreases the RCM errors in reproducing drought frequency derived from the NARR data. Different timescales of input precipitation in the bias corrections show similar results. The relative changes in drought frequency in future scenario compared to historical scenario are similar whether both scenarios are bias corrected or both are not bias corrected." (Aryal, Y. and J. Zhu, 2016, Climatic Change) (Published December 10, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Models and Tools /
(Posted December 19, 2016)

 

Sources and implications of deep uncertainties surrounding sea-level projections

Report Sources and implications of deep uncertainties surrounding sea-level projections - "Long-term flood risk management often relies on future sea-level projections. Projected uncertainty ranges are however widely divergent as a result of different methodological choices. The IPCC has condensed this deep uncertainty into a single uncertainty range covering 66% probability or more. Alternatively, structured expert judgment summarizes divergent expert opinions in a single distribution. Recently published uncertainty ranges that are derived from these 'consensus' assessments appear to differ by up to a factor four. This might result in overconfidence or overinvestment in strategies to cope with sea-level change. Here we explore possible reasons for these different interpretations. This is important for (i) the design of robust strategies and (ii) the exploration of pathways that may eventually lead to some kind of consensus distributions that are relatively straightforward to interpret." (Bakker, A. M. R., et al., 2016, Climatic Change) (Published December 9, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted December 19, 2016)

 

Explaining Extreme Events of 2015 from a Climate Perspective

Report Explaining Extreme Events of 2015 from a Climate Perspective - "This fifth edition of explaining extreme events of the previous year (2015) from a climate perspective continues to provide evidence that climate change is altering some extreme event risk. . . . Many papers in this year's report demonstrate that attribution science is capable of separating the effects of natural drivers including the strong 2015 El Nino from the influences of long-term human-induced climate change." (Published December 15, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted December 19, 2016)

 

King tides expected to have more impact as sea levels rise

News article King tides expected to have more impact as sea levels rise (Published December 15, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted December 15, 2016)

 

UCD receives $6M to tame 'wild west' of climate datasets

News article UCD receives $6M to tame 'wild west' of climate datasets (Published December 13, 2016)
Source: Davis Enterprise
Climate Change Topics: Models and Tools /
(Posted December 15, 2016)

 

Extreme downpours could increase fivefold across parts of the U.S.

News article Extreme downpours could increase fivefold across parts of the U.S.
Related Link: http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate3168.html
(Published December 14, 2016)
Source: Environmental Research Web
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted December 15, 2016)

 

Scientists are frantically copying U.S. climate data, fearing it might vanish under Trump

News article Scientists are frantically copying U.S. climate data, fearing it might vanish under Trump (Published December 14, 2016)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act /
(Posted December 14, 2016)

 

Looking Forward: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate: National Action Plan Update

Report Looking Forward: Priorities for Managing Freshwater Resources in a Changing Climate: National Action Plan Update - Recommends federal actions to support water resilience in the areas of data and research, planning and decision support, and training and outreach. Includes an inventory of major hydro-dlimatic data collection systems in the United States. (Published December 5, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Models and Tools /
(Posted December 14, 2016)

 

The future intensification of hourly precipitation extremes

Report The future intensification of hourly precipitation extremes - "Extreme precipitation intensities have increased in all regions of the Contiguous United States (CONUS) and are expected to further increase with warming at scaling rates of about 7% per degree Celsius, suggesting a significant increase of flash flood hazards due to climate change. However, the scaling rates between extreme precipitation and temperature are strongly dependent on the region, temperature, and moisture availability, which inhibits simple extrapolation of the scaling rate from past climate data into the future. Here we study observed and simulated changes in local precipitation extremes over the CONUS by analysing a very high resolution (4?km horizontal grid spacing) current and high-end climate scenario that realistically simulates hourly precipitation extremes. We show that extreme precipitation is increasing with temperature in moist, energy-limited, environments and decreases abruptly in dry, moisture-limited, environments. This novel framework explains the large variability in the observed and modelled scaling rates and helps with understanding the significant frequency and intensity increases in future hourly extreme precipitation events and their interaction with larger scales." (Prein, A. F., et al., 2016, Nature Climate Change) (Published December 5, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted December 14, 2016)

 

The world's wet regions are getting wetter, the dry regions are getting drier

News article The world's wet regions are getting wetter, the dry regions are getting drier (Published December 12, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 12, 2016)

 

Rising Seas, Federal Inaction and Donald Trump Turn Climate Change into a Local Issue

News article Rising Seas, Federal Inaction and Donald Trump Turn Climate Change into a Local Issue (Published December 8, 2016)
Source: Metro/San Jose Inside
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Santa Clara Valley Water District / Sea level rise /
(Posted December 8, 2016)

 

Trump Expected to Tap Champion of Fossil Fuels as Environmental Chief

News article Trump Expected to Tap Champion of Fossil Fuels as Environmental Chief (Published December 8, 2016)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act /
(Posted December 8, 2016)

 

Trump names climate change skeptic and oil industry ally to lead the EPA

News article Trump names climate change skeptic and oil industry ally to lead the EPA (Published December 8, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act /
(Posted December 7, 2016)

 

Trump Picks Scott Pruitt, Climate Change Denialist, to Lead E.P.A.

News article Trump Picks Scott Pruitt, Climate Change Denialist, to Lead E.P.A. (Published December 8, 2016)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act /
(Posted December 7, 2016)

 

Climate Change Will Bring Wetter Storms in U.S., Study Says

News article Climate Change Will Bring Wetter Storms in U.S., Study Says (Published December 6, 2016)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 6, 2016)

 

Reclamation Releases Progress Report on Meeting Climate Change Adaptation Strategy

News article Reclamation Releases Progress Report on Meeting Climate Change Adaptation Strategy
Related Link: http://www.usbr.gov/climate/docs/2016ClimateStrategy.pdf
(Published November 29, 2016)
Source: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 2, 2016)

 

Climate Adaptation: The State of Practice in U.S. Communities

Report Climate Adaptation: The State of Practice in U.S. Communities - "Communities in the U.S. are undertaking a rich array of climate adaptation actions that are making them more resilient to climate impacts. These actions provide models and lessons that can immediately help other communities better protect themselves from climate risks like flooding, heat waves, wildfires, and severe storms. In aggregate, these activities demonstrate that more U.S. communities are attempting to prepare for climate risks than previously thought. However, many of these promising practices are piecemeal and fail to comprehensively address climate change and its associated uncertainties. This suggests that, despite the many concrete vulnerability reductions achieved by our case study communities, much more work is needed for communities to holistically reduce their vulnerability to climate variability, extreme events, and climate change." Case studies. (Kresge Foundation) (Published November 30, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Drought / Flooding / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 2, 2016)

 

Climate Change Adaptation Strategy: 2016 Progress Report

Report Climate Change Adaptation Strategy: 2016 Progress Report - USBR has four goals: increase water management flexibility, enhance climate adaptation planning, improve infrastructure reliability, and expand information sharing. (Published November 29, 2016)
Source: United States. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Dams and reservoirs / Drought / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Flooding / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 2, 2016)

 

Incorporating snow albedo feedback into downscaled temperature and snow cover projections for California's Sierra Nevada

Report Incorporating snow albedo feedback into downscaled temperature and snow cover projections for California's Sierra Nevada - "California's Sierra Nevada is a high-elevation mountain range with significant seasonal snow cover. Under anthropogenic climate change, amplification of the warming is expected to occur at elevations near snow margins due to snow albedo feedback. However, climate change projections for the Sierra Nevada made by global climate models (GCMs) and statistical downscaling methods miss this key process. Dynamical downscaling simulates the additional warming due to snow albedo feedback. Ideally, dynamical downscaling would be applied to a large ensemble of 30+ GCMs to project ensemble-mean outcomes and intermodel spread, but this is far too computationally expensive. To approximate the results that would occur if the entire GCM ensemble were dynamically downscaled, a hybrid dynamical-statistical downscaling approach is used." (Walton, D. B., et al., 2016, Journal of Climate) (Published November 8, 2016)
Source: University of California, Los Angeles
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 1, 2016)

 

Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region

Report Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region - "The most comprehensive study of climate change in LA to date, the Climate Change in the Los Angeles Region Project was conducted by Center for Climate Science Faculty Director Alex Hall and his research group between 2010 and 2015. Dr. Hall and his team developed a novel method for bringing global climate model projections to high spatial resolution, creating neighborhood-by-neighborhood projections of future climate over the greater Los Angeles region under different scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions." (Published December 31, 2015)
Source: University of California, Los Angeles
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted December 1, 2016)

 

Safeguarding California: CA's Natural Resources Secretary on Resiliency & Climate Change Plans

News article Safeguarding California: CA's Natural Resources Secretary on Resiliency & Climate Change Plans (Published November 29, 2016)
Source: Planning Report
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Bay Area and Delta / California: Statewide / Energy management and conservation / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 30, 2016)

 

Significant and inevitable end-of-21st-century advances in surface runoff timing in California's Sierra Nevada

Report Significant and inevitable end-of-21st-century advances in surface runoff timing in California's Sierra Nevada - "Key points: 1. End-of-21st-century near-surface warming leads to statistically significant advances in surface runoff timing in the Sierra Nevada Mountains for all plausible forcing scenarios and all GCMs. Thus a detectable change in runoff timing is inevitable. 2. The 2000-2750m elevation band is associated with the greatest runoff timing advances, due in large part to snow albedo feedback. 3. Even when greenhouse gas emissions are curtailed, the runoff change is still climatically significant when compared to natural variability. If greenhouse gas emissions continue unabated, a truly dramatic change in surface hydrology is anticipated." (Schwartz, M., et al., 2016) (Published November 21, 2016)
Source: University of California, Los Angeles
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 30, 2016)

 

Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought

Report Anthropogenic Warming Impacts on California Snowpack During Drought - "Sierra Nevada climate and snowpack is simulated during the period of extreme drought from 2011 to 2015 and compared to an identical simulation except for the removal of 20th century anthropogenic warming. Anthropogenic warming reduced average snowpack levels by 25%, with mid-to-low elevations experiencing reductions between 26-43%. In terms of event frequency, return periods associated with anomalies in 4-year April 1 SWE are estimated to have doubled, and possibly quadrupled, due to past warming. We also estimate effects of future anthropogenic warmth on snowpack during a drought similar to that of 2011-2015. Further snowpack declines of 60-85% are expected, depending on emissions scenario. The return periods associated with future snowpack levels are estimated to range from millennia to much longer. Therefore, past human emissions of greenhouse gases are already negatively impacting statewide water resources, and much more severe impacts are likely to be inevitable." (Berg, N. and Hall, A., 2016) (Published November 25, 2016)
Source: University of California, Los Angeles
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 30, 2016)

 

Sierra snowpack could drop 50% by the end of the century due to climate change

News article Sierra snowpack could drop 50% by the end of the century due to climate change
Related Link: http://research.atmos.ucla.edu/csrl/publications/Hall/Schwartz_sfcrunoff_timing_submitted.pdf
(Published November 28, 2016)
Source: Southern California Public Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 29, 2016)

 

Building resilience to climate change one landscape at a time

News article Building resilience to climate change one landscape at a time (Published November 17, 2016)
Source: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted November 28, 2016)

 

Trump Has Options for Undoing Obama's Climate Legacy

News article Trump Has Options for Undoing Obama's Climate Legacy (Published November 27, 2016)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted November 28, 2016)

 

Building the Future of Water and Energy in California (Opinion)

News article Building the Future of Water and Energy in California (Opinion) (Published November 23, 2016)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Energy management and conservation / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted November 23, 2016)

 

EPA Aims to Finish Climate Rules; Decisions Fall to Trump (and other regulations)

News article EPA Aims to Finish Climate Rules; Decisions Fall to Trump (and other regulations) (Published November 17, 2016)
Source: Bloomberg BNA
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted November 23, 2016)

 

Get used to heat records; study predicts far more in future

News article Get used to heat records; study predicts far more in future
Related Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/11/15/1606117113.abstract
(Published November 22, 2016)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted November 22, 2016)

 

US daily temperature records past, present, and future

Report US daily temperature records past, present, and future - "Future changes in temperature extremes over the continental United States are represented by the ratio of daily record high maximum temperatures to daily record low minimum temperatures and computed as a function of mean temperature increase that does not depend on scenario. A nonlinear empirical fit of the relation between this ratio and average temperature, using observations from 1930 to 2015, is extended to 2100 and compared with the climate model projections. The projections of the ratio are somewhat higher than the empirical projection from observations, continuing a positively biased trend in daily record high temperatures in the 20th century in the models, which we link to less-than-observed summer precipitation and evapotranspiration." (Meehl, G. A., et al., 2016, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) (Published November 21, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted November 22, 2016)

 

Stormwater Management Importance Underscored in Los Angeles Basin Study Released by Bureau of Reclamation

News article Stormwater Management Importance Underscored in Los Angeles Basin Study Released by Bureau of Reclamation
Related Link: http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp/docs/fy2017/LABasinStudySummaryReport.pdf
(Published November 17, 2016)
Source: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 21, 2016)

 

Rising Reality: Bay Area's answer to sea level rise a battle on many fronts

News article Rising Reality: Bay Area's answer to sea level rise a battle on many fronts (Published November 19, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 21, 2016)

 

6 Feet of Sea Level Rise? VR Shows How it Might Look in Santa Monica

News article 6 Feet of Sea Level Rise? VR Shows How it Might Look in Santa Monica (Published November 17, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 18, 2016)

 

High-tech sensors monitor ecosystems in climate change research program

News article High-tech sensors monitor ecosystems in climate change research program (Published October 21, 2016)
Source: UC Santa Cruz
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted November 17, 2016)

 

Pacific coast marshes more resistant to rising seas than Atlantic

News article Pacific coast marshes more resistant to rising seas than Atlantic (Published November 15, 2016)
Source: U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 17, 2016)

 

Causes of extreme ridges that induce California droughts

Report Causes of extreme ridges that induce California droughts - "California droughts are often caused by high-amplitude and persistent ridges near and off the west coast without apparent connections with ENSO. Here with a hierarchy of climate models, we demonstrate that extreme ridges in this region are associated with a continuum of zonal wavenumber-5 circumglobal teleconnection patterns that originate from midlatitude atmospheric internal dynamics. Although tropical diabatic heating anomalies are not essential to the formation and maintenance of these wave patterns, certain persistent heating anomalies may double the probability of ridges with amplitudes in the 90th percentile occurring on interannual time scales. Those heating anomalies can be caused by either natural variability or possibly by climate change and they do not necessarily depend on ENSO. The extreme ridges that occurred during the 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 winters could be examples of ridges produced by heating anomalies that are not associated with ENSO. This mechanism could provide a source of subseasonal-to-interannual predictability, beyond the predictability provided by ENSO." (Teng, H., 2016, Journal of Climate) (Published November 1, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought /
(Posted November 16, 2016)

 

Will Trump end California's climate rules?

News article Will Trump end California's climate rules? (Published November 14, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: AB 32 / California: Statewide / Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted November 14, 2016)

 

Salmon, Climate Change Cast Doubt on Future of Dams

News article Salmon, Climate Change Cast Doubt on Future of Dams (Published November 11, 2016)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Dams and reservoirs /
(Posted November 14, 2016)

 

Coastal sea level rise with warming above 2 degrees C

Report Coastal sea level rise with warming above 2 degrees C - "Warming of 2 degrees C will lead to an average global ocean rise of 20 cm, but more than 90% of coastal areas will experience greater rises. If warming continues above 2 degrees C, then, by 2100, sea level will be rising faster than at any time during human civilization, and 80% of the global coastline is expected to exceed the 95th percentile upper limit of 1.8 m for mean global ocean sea level rise. Coastal communities, notably rapidly expanding cities in the developing world; small island states; United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Cultural World Heritage sites; and vulnerable tropical coastal ecosystems will have a very limited time after midcentury to adapt to these rises." (Jevrejeva, S., 2016, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) (Published November 7, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted November 14, 2016)

 

Why scientists are so worried about sea-level rise in the second half of this century

News article Why scientists are so worried about sea-level rise in the second half of this century
Related Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/11/02/1605312113
(Published November 7, 2016)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted November 10, 2016)

 

States May Drive U.S. Climate Policy Under Trump

News article States May Drive U.S. Climate Policy Under Trump (Published November 10, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted November 10, 2016)

 

Will Paris climate accord and other environmental pacts survive a Trump presidency?

News article Will Paris climate accord and other environmental pacts survive a Trump presidency? (Published November 10, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted November 10, 2016)

 

Climate Experts Weigh in on Trump's Election Win

News article Climate Experts Weigh in on Trump's Election Win (Published November 9, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted November 10, 2016)

 

Isotopic signature of extreme precipitation events in the western U.S. and associated phases of Arctic and tropical climate modes

Report Isotopic signature of extreme precipitation events in the western U.S. and associated phases of Arctic and tropical climate modes - "Extreme precipitation events, commonly associated with 'Atmospheric Rivers,' are projected to increase in frequency and severity in western North America; however, the intensity and landfall position are difficult to forecast accurately. As the isotopic signature of precipitation has been widely utilized as a tracer of the hydrologic cycle and could potentially provide information about key physical processes, we utilize both climate and precipitation isotope data to investigate these events in California from 2001 to 2011. Although individual events have extreme isotopic signatures linked to associated circulation anomalies, the composite across all events unexpectedly resembles the weighted mean for the entire study period, reflecting diverse moisture trajectories and associated teleconnection phases. We document that 90% of events reaching this location occurred during the negative Arctic Oscillation, suggesting a possible link with higher-latitude warming. We also utilize precipitation data of extreme precipitation events across the entire western U.S. to investigate the relationships between key tropical and Arctic climate modes known to influence precipitation in this region. Results indicate that the wettest conditions occur when the negative Arctic Oscillation, negative Pacific/North American pattern, and positive Southern Oscillation are in sync and that precipitation has increased in the southwestern U.S. and decreased in the northwestern U.S. relative to this phase combination's 1979-2011 climatology. Furthermore, the type of El Nino-Southern Oscillation event, Central Pacific or Eastern Pacific, influences the occurrence, landfall location, and isotopic composition of precipitation." (McCabe-Glynn, S., 2016, Journal of Geophysical Research) (Published August 23, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted November 9, 2016)

 

California Jurisdictions Addressing Climate Change

Report California Jurisdictions Addressing Climate Change - California cities and counties that have made climate action plans, GHG reduction plans, or other plans, with links. (Updated 2016) (Published March 16, 2016)
Source: California. Governor's Office of Planning and Research
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Sample Climate Action Plans /
(Posted November 8, 2016)

 

Climate Adaptation Planning Builds Water Utility Resilience

Report Climate Adaptation Planning Builds Water Utility Resilience - "Climate change and extreme weather events can pose significant challenges for drinking water, wastewater, and stormwater utilities. The US Environmental Protection Agency has developed an array of customizable software tools for understanding and assessing threats related to climate change to help utilities prepare for and be more resilient to such challenges." (Dubin, L., 2015, Opflow) (Published March 1, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Models and Tools / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted November 8, 2016)

 

Opportunities to Enhance the Nation's Resilience to Climate Change

Report Opportunities to Enhance the Nation's Resilience to Climate Change - Federal efforts in 1. Advancing and applying science-based information, technology, and tools to address climate risk; 2. Integrating climate resilience into Federal agency missions, operations, and culture; and 3. Supporting community efforts to enhance climate resilience. (Published October 31, 2016)
Source: United States. White House
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act /
(Posted November 8, 2016)

 

On the Colorado River, Climate Change is Water Change

News article On the Colorado River, Climate Change is Water Change (Published November 7, 2016)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Streamflow / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 7, 2016)

 

The World Isn't Doing Enough to Slow Climate Change

News article The World Isn't Doing Enough to Slow Climate Change (Published November 4, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Temperature /
(Posted November 7, 2016)

 

Effects of climate change on tidal marshes along a latitudinal gradient in California

Report Effects of climate change on tidal marshes along a latitudinal gradient in California - "The coastal region of California supports a wealth of ecosystem services including habitat provision for wildlife and fisheries. Tidal marshes, mudflats, and shallow bays within coastal estuaries link marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats, and provide economic and recreational benefits to local communities. Climate change effects such as sea-level rise (SLR) are altering these habitats, but we know little about how these areas will change over the next 50–100 years. Our study examined the projected effects of three recent SLR scenarios produced for the West Coast of North America on tidal marshes in California. We compiled physical and biological data, including coastal topography, tidal inundation, plant composition, and sediment accretion to project how SLR may alter these ecosystems in the future. The goal of our research was to provide results that support coastal management and conservation efforts across California. Under a low SLR scenario, all study sites remained vegetated tidal wetlands, with most sites showing little elevation and vegetation change relative to sea level. At most sites, mid SLR projections led to increases in low marsh habitat at the expense of middle and high marsh habitat. . . . Under a high SLR scenario, most sites were projected to lose vegetated habitat, eventually converting to intertidal mudflats. Our results suggest that California marshes are vulnerable to major habitat shifts under mid or high rates of SLR, especially in the latter part of the century. Loss of vegetated tidal marshes in California due to SLR is expected to impact ecosystem services that are dependent on coastal wetlands such as wildlife habitat, carbon sequestration, improved water quality, and coastal protection from storms." (Open-File Report 2016-1125) (Published August 5, 2016)
Source: United States. Geological Survey
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 4, 2016)

 

Urgency, But No Easy Answers, in Effort to Counter Sea-Level Rise

News article Urgency, But No Easy Answers, in Effort to Counter Sea-Level Rise (Published November 2, 2016)
Source: Courthouse News Service
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 3, 2016)

 

Past Climates Provide a Roadmap to the Future

News article Past Climates Provide a Roadmap to the Future (Published October 28, 2016)
Source: U.S. Geological Survey
Climate Change Topics: Research /
(Posted November 3, 2016)

 

Acting Locally to Address Sea Level Rise

News article Acting Locally to Address Sea Level Rise (Published November 2, 2016)
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / Sea level rise /
(Posted November 2, 2016)

 

Interlinking climate change with water-energy-food nexus and related ecosystem processes in California case studies

Report Interlinking climate change with water-energy-food nexus and related ecosystem processes in California case studies - "Global climate change creates critical challenges with increasing temperature, reducing snowpack, and changing precipitation for water, energy, and food, as well as ecosystem processes at regional scales. Ecosystem services provide life support, goods, and natural resources from water, energy, and food, as well as the environments. There are knowledge gaps from the lack of conceptual framework and practices to interlink major climate change drivers of water resources with water-energy-food nexus and related ecosystem processes. This paper provided an overview of research background, developed a conceptual framework to bridge these knowledge gaps, summarized California case studies for practices in cross sector ecosystem services, and identified future research needs. In this conceptual framework, climate change drivers of changing temperature, snowpack, and precipitation are interlinked with life cycles in water, energy, food, and related key elements in ecosystem processes. Case studies in California indicated climate change affected variation in increasing temperature and changing hydrology at the regional scales. A large variation in average energy intensity values was also estimated from ground water and federal, state, and local water supplies both within each hydrological region and among the ten hydrological regions in California. The increased regional temperature, changes in snowpack and precipitation, and increased water stresses from drought can reduce ecosystem services and affect the water and energy nexus and agricultural food production, as well as fish and wildlife habitats in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and Central Valley watersheds. Regional decisions and practices in integrated management of water, energy, food, and related ecosystem processes are essential to adapt and mitigate global climate change impacts at the regional scales. Science and policy support for interdisciplinary research are critical to develop the database and tools for comprehensive analysis to fill knowledge gaps and address ecosystem service complexity, the related natural resource investment, and integrated planning needs." (Liu, Q., 2016, Ecological Processes) (Published September 29, 2016)
Source: California. Dept. of Water Resources
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Energy management and conservation /
(Posted November 2, 2016)

 

Perspectives on the causes of exceptionally low 2015 snowpack in the western United States

Report Perspectives on the causes of exceptionally low 2015 snowpack in the western United States - "Augmenting previous papers about the exceptional 2011-2015 California drought, we offer new perspectives on the 'snow drought' that extended into Oregon in 2014 and Washington in 2015. Over 80% of measurement sites west of 115 degrees W experienced record low snowpack in 2015, and we estimate a return period of 400-1000 years for California's snowpack under the questionable assumption of stationarity. Hydrologic modeling supports the conclusion that 2015 was the most severe on record by a wide margin. Using a crowd-sourced superensemble of regional climate model simulations, we show that both human influence and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies contributed strongly to the risk of snow drought in Oregon and Washington: the contribution of SST anomalies was about twice that of human influence. By contrast, SSTs and humans appear to have played a smaller role in creating California's snow drought. In all three states, the anthropogenic effect on temperature exacerbated the snow drought." (Mote, P. W., et al., 2016, Geophysical Research Letters) (Published October 31, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 2, 2016)

 

Study blames low 2015 Western snowpack on high temperatures

News article Study blames low 2015 Western snowpack on high temperatures
Related Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL069965/full
(Published November 1, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted November 1, 2016)

 

Little Hoover Commission Explores Local Response to Climate Change

News article Little Hoover Commission Explores Local Response to Climate Change (Published October 27, 2016)
Source: Association of California Water Agencies
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / California: Water/Flood Protection Districts / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Santa Clara Valley Water District / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted October 28, 2016)

 

Seafood's new normal: California's coastal ecosystem -- and the fisheries that depend on it -- are in the grip of a huge disruption

News article Seafood's new normal: California's coastal ecosystem -- and the fisheries that depend on it -- are in the grip of a huge disruption (Published October 28, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted October 28, 2016)

 

Climate-change ruling for Arctic seals has ramifications across U.S., California

News article Climate-change ruling for Arctic seals has ramifications across U.S., California (Published October 26, 2016)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted October 26, 2016)

 

Scientists just showed what it truly means when a huge Antarctic glacier is unstable

News article Scientists just showed what it truly means when a huge Antarctic glacier is unstable (Published October 26, 2016)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Sea and Polar ice /
(Posted October 26, 2016)

 

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoir Water Surfaces: A New Global Synthesis

Report Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoir Water Surfaces: A New Global Synthesis - "Collectively, reservoirs created by dams are thought to be an important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) to the atmosphere. So far, efforts to quantify, model, and manage these emissions have been limited by data availability and inconsistencies in methodological approach. Here, we synthesize reservoir CH4, CO2, and N2O emission data with three main objectives: (1) to generate a global estimate of GHG emissions from reservoirs, (2) to identify the best predictors of these emissions, and (3) to consider the effect of methodology on emission estimates. We estimate that GHG emissions from reservoir water surfaces account for 0.8 (0.5-1.2) Pg CO2 equivalents per year, with the majority of this forcing due to CH4. We then discuss the potential for several alternative pathways such as dam degassing and downstream emissions to contribute significantly to overall emissions. Although prior studies have linked reservoir GHG emissions to reservoir age and latitude, we find that factors related to reservoir productivity are better predictors of emission." (Deemer, B. R., et al., 2016, BioScience) (Published October 5, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Dams and reservoirs / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases /
(Posted October 26, 2016)

 

Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop

Report Characterizing Risk in Climate Change Assessments: Proceedings of a Workshop - The National Academies were asked "to conduct a workshop to explore ways to frame the [National Climate Assement, 4th edition] and subsequent NCA reports in terms of risks to society. The workshop was intended to collect experienced views on how to characterize and communicate information about climate-related hazards, risks, and opportunities that will support decision makers in their efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce vulnerability to likely changes in climate, and increase resilience to those changes." (Published September 18, 2016)
Source: National Academies
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Flooding / Global issues, human impacts / Sea level rise /
(Posted October 26, 2016)

 

Species may be listed as threatened based on climate change projections, court says

News article Species may be listed as threatened based on climate change projections, court says (Published October 25, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted October 25, 2016)

 

Study: Reservoirs a 'Significant' Contributor to Climate Change

News article Study: Reservoirs a 'Significant' Contributor to Climate Change
Related Link: http://bioscience.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/10/02/biosci.biw117
(Published October 25, 2016)
Source: Water Deeply
Climate Change Topics: Dams and reservoirs / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases /
(Posted October 25, 2016)

 

Revised Guidance for Treatment of Climate Change in NMFS Endangered Species Act Decisions

Report Revised Guidance for Treatment of Climate Change in NMFS Endangered Species Act Decisions - Guidance for National Marine Fisheries Service staff on 1. consideration of future climate condition uncertainty, 2. selecting a climate change projection timeframe, 3. evaluating the adequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, 4. critical habitat designation in a changing climate, 5. consideration of future beneficial effects, 6. responsiveness and effectiveness of management actions in a changing climate, and 7. incorporating climate change into project designs. (Published June 17, 2016)
Source: United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted October 25, 2016)

 

Climate Change is Shaping California's Water Future: Watch Our New Webinar

News article Climate Change is Shaping California's Water Future: Watch Our New Webinar (Published October 24, 2016)
Source: Union of Concerned Scientists
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Groundwater / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted October 24, 2016)

 

NMFS Adopts New Guidance for Incorporating Climate Change into ESA Decisions

News article NMFS Adopts New Guidance for Incorporating Climate Change into ESA Decisions (Published October 18, 2016)
Source: Somach, Simmons, and Dunn
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted October 21, 2016)

 

Are California's Utilities Their Own Worst Drought Enemies?

News article Are California's Utilities Their Own Worst Drought Enemies? (Published October 11, 2016)
Source: Water Online
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted October 13, 2016)

 

Is using less water the secret to cutting our greenhouse gas emissions?

News article Is using less water the secret to cutting our greenhouse gas emissions? (Published October 12, 2016)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted October 13, 2016)

 

Climate Change and the Delta

Report Climate Change and the Delta - Projected effects of climate change, including more evaporation, more floods and droughts, sea level rise. (Dettinger, M., et al., 2016, San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science) (Published October 12, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Drought / Flooding / Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted October 12, 2016)

 

State agency to draw up plan for sea level rise in Bay Area

News article State agency to draw up plan for sea level rise in Bay Area (Published October 10, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Sea level rise /
(Posted October 11, 2016)

 

Marin water district joins 'deep green' electricity plan

News article Marin water district joins 'deep green' electricity plan (Published October 8, 2016)
Source: Marin Independent-Journal
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / California: Water/Flood Protection Districts / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) / Energy management and conservation /
(Posted October 11, 2016)

 

New EPA Web Portal Helps Communities Prepare for Climate Change

News article New EPA Web Portal Helps Communities Prepare for Climate Change
Related Link: https://www.epa.gov/ARC-X
(Published October 6, 2016)
Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Drought / Flooding /
(Posted October 7, 2016)

 

Adaptation services of floodplains and wetlands under transformational climate change

Report Adaptation services of floodplains and wetlands under transformational climate change - "Adaptation services are the ecosystem processes and services that benefit people by increasing their ability to adapt to change. . . . For example, ecosystem functions and services of floodplains depend on river flows. In those regions of the world where climate change projections are for hotter, drier conditions, floods will be less frequent and floodplains will either persist, though with modified structure and function, or transform to terrestrial (flood-independent) ecosystems. Many currently valued ecosystem services will reduce in supply or become unavailable, but new options are provided by adaptation services. We present a case study from the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia, for operationalizing the adaptation services concept for floodplains and wetlands. We found large changes in flow and flood regimes are likely under a scenario of +1.6 degrees C by 2030, even with additional water restored to rivers under the proposed Murray–Darling Basin Plan. We predict major changes to floodplain ecosystems, including contraction of riparian forests and woodlands and expansion of terrestrial, drought-tolerant vegetation communities. Examples of adaptation services under this scenario include substitution of irrigated agriculture with dryland cropping and floodplain grazing; mitigation of damage from rarer, extreme floods; and increased tourism, recreational, and cultural values derived from fewer, smaller wetlands that can be maintained with environmental flows. Management for adaptation services will require decisions on where intervention can enable ecosystem persistence and where transformation is inevitable. New ways of managing water that include consideration of the increasing importance of adaptation services requires major changes to decision-making that better account for landscape heterogeneity and large-scale change rather than attempting to maintain ecosystems in fixed states." (Colloff, M. J., et al., 2016, Ecological Applications) (Published June 8, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change / Flooding /
(Posted October 7, 2016)

 

The Southwest Will Probably Suffer a Crippling Megadrought This Century

News article The Southwest Will Probably Suffer a Crippling Megadrought This Century
Related Link: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/10/e1600873
(Published October 5, 2016)
Source: Popular Mechanics
Climate Change Topics: Drought /
(Posted October 6, 2016)

 

Climate Change Adaptation Resource Center (ARC-X)

Report Climate Change Adaptation Resource Center (ARC-X) - "An interactive resource to help local governments effectively deliver services to their communities even as the climate changes. Decision makers can create an integrated package of information tailored specifically to their needs. Once users select areas of interest, they will find information about: the risks posed by climate change to the issues of concern; relevant adaptation strategies; case studies illustrating how other communities have successfully adapted to those risks and tools to replicate their successes; and EPA funding opportunities." (Published )
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Drought / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Water quality / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted October 6, 2016)

 

Designing Infrastructure with Climate Change in Mind: Assembly Bill 2800 Becomes Law

News article Designing Infrastructure with Climate Change in Mind: Assembly Bill 2800 Becomes Law (Published October 4, 2016)
Source: Union of Concerned Scientists
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted October 5, 2016)

 

Tectonic Subsidence of California Estuaries Increases Forecasts of Relative Sea-Level Rise

Report Tectonic Subsidence of California Estuaries Increases Forecasts of Relative Sea-Level Rise - "Even along the generally uplifting coast of the Pacific US, local geologic structures can cause subsidence. In this study, we quantify Holocene-averaged subsidence rates in four estuaries (Carpinteria Slough, Goleta Slough, Campus Lagoon, and Morro Bay) along the southern and central California coast by comparing radiocarbon-dated estuarine material to a regional sea-level curve. Holocene-averaged rates of vertical motion range from subsidence of 1.4 plus or minus 2.4, 1.2 plus or minus 0.4, and 0.4 plus or minus 0.3 mm/year in Morro Bay, Carpinteria Slough, and Goleta Slough, respectively, to possible uplift in Campus Lagoon (-0.1 plus or minus 0.9 mm/year). The calculated rates of subsidence are of the same magnitude as rates of relative sea-level rise experienced over the late Holocene and effectively double the ongoing rates of relative sea-level rise experienced over the last five decades on other parts of the coast. The difference in rates of vertical motion among these four estuaries is attributed to their geological settings. Estuaries developed in subsiding geological structures such as synclines and fault-bounded basins are subsiding at much higher rates than those developed within flooded river valleys incised into marine terraces. Restoration projects accounting for future sea-level rise must consider the geologic setting of the estuaries and, if applicable, include subsidence in future sea-level rise scenarios, even along the tectonically uplifting US Pacific Coast." (Simms, A., et al., 2016, Estuaries and Coasts) (Published May 11, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Sea level rise /
(Posted October 5, 2016)

 

Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness

Report Partnership for Resilience and Preparedness - Data gathered from public and private sources, including downscaled temperature and precipitation projections and drought and flood data. Includes Sonoma County Water Agency's climate resilience dashboard. (Published September 22, 2016)
Source: United States.
Climate Change Topics: California: Water/Flood Protection Districts / Flooding / Models and Tools / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted October 5, 2016)

 

Relative impacts of mitigation, temperature, and precipitation on 21st-century megadrought risk in the American Southwest

Report Relative impacts of mitigation, temperature, and precipitation on 21st-century megadrought risk in the American Southwest - "Megadroughts are comparable in severity to the worst droughts of the 20th century but are of much longer duration. A megadrought in the American Southwest would impose unprecedented stress on the limited water resources of the area, making it critical to evaluate future risks not only under different climate change mitigation scenarios but also for different aspects of regional hydroclimate. We find that changes in the mean hydroclimate state, rather than its variability, determine megadrought risk in the American Southwest. Estimates of megadrought probabilities based on precipitation alone tend to underestimate risk. Furthermore, business-as-usual emissions of greenhouse gases will drive regional warming and drying, regardless of large precipitation uncertainties. We find that regional temperature increases alone push megadrought risk above 70, 90, or 99% by the end of the century, even if precipitation increases moderately, does not change, or decreases, respectively. Although each possibility is supported by some climate model simulations, the latter is the most common outcome for the American Southwest in Coupled Model Intercomparison 5 generation models. An aggressive reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions cuts megadrought risks nearly in half." (Ault, T. R., et al., 2016, Science Advances) (Published October 5, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Drought /
(Posted October 5, 2016)

 

California's Water

Report California's Water - Updated report on water issues. (October 2016) (Published October 4, 2016)
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted October 5, 2016)

 

Return to Climate Change Portal

Links on these pages go to sites of interest to the staff of the Santa Clara Valley Water District. Listing a site on these pages does not constitute an endorsement by the District.

Created and maintained by Bob Teeter, District Librarian; organized by Sarah Young