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Climate Change Blog

 

Contemporary Drought and Future Effects of Climate Change on the Endangered Blunt-Nosed Leopard Lizard, Gambelia sila

Report Contemporary Drought and Future Effects of Climate Change on the Endangered Blunt-Nosed Leopard Lizard, Gambelia sila - "Extreme weather events can provide unique opportunities for testing models that predict the effect of climate change. Droughts of increasing severity have been predicted under numerous models, thus contemporary droughts may allow us to test these models prior to the onset of the more extreme effects predicted with a changing climate. In the third year of an ongoing severe drought, surveys failed to detect neonate endangered blunt-nosed leopard lizards in a subset of previously surveyed populations where we expected to see them. By conducting surveys at a large number of sites across the range of the species over a short time span, we were able to establish a strong positive correlation between winter precipitation and the presence of neonate leopard lizards over geographic space. Our results are consistent with those of numerous longitudinal studies and are in accordance with predictive climate change models. We suggest that scientists can take immediate advantage of droughts while they are still in progress to test patterns of occurrence in other drought-sensitive species and thus provide for more robust models of climate change effects on biodiversity." (Westphal, M. F., et al., 2016, PLOS One) (Published May 2, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted May 5, 2016)

 

World Bank: The way climate change is really going to hurt us is through water

News article World Bank: The way climate change is really going to hurt us is through water (Published May 4, 2016)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Flooding / Global issues, human impacts / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted May 3, 2016)

 

How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise?

News article How much does groundwater contribute to sea level rise? (Published May 2, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Groundwater / Sea level rise /
(Posted May 3, 2016)

 

2015 Highlights of Progress: Responses to Climate Change by the National Water Program

Report 2015 Highlights of Progress: Responses to Climate Change by the National Water Program - EPA's work in water infrastructure, watersheds and wetlands, coastal waters, and water quality. (Published April 21, 2016)
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Water quality / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted May 2, 2016)

 

Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources

Report Understanding Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources - "This training module is designed to increase your understanding of the causes of climate change, its potential impacts on water resources, and the challenges water resource managers are facing. The course contains three parts which will take about 45 minutes to complete." Part of the Watershed Academy (Published February 9, 2016)
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted May 2, 2016)

 

Fueling big hopes, South Bay launches alternative utility

News article Fueling big hopes, South Bay launches alternative utility (Published April 22, 2016)
Source: Mountain View Voice
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) / Renewable energy /
(Posted April 25, 2016)

 

Oro Loma: Can Wastewater Save the Bay from Sea Level Rise?

News article Oro Loma: Can Wastewater Save the Bay from Sea Level Rise? (Published April 21, 2016)
Source: Bay Nature
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 25, 2016)

 

Global warming has made the weather better for most in U.S. -- but don't get used to it, study says

News article Global warming has made the weather better for most in U.S. -- but don't get used to it, study says (Published April 21, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted April 21, 2016)

 

Earth's hot streak continues for a record 11 months

News article Earth's hot streak continues for a record 11 months (Published April 20, 2016)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted April 20, 2016)

 

U.S. Climate Atlas

Report U.S. Climate Atlas - "These maps are based on the new nClimDiv (New Climate Division) dataset which uses daily observations of temperature and precipitation from over 10,000 stations in the U.S. NCEI scientists are using new methodologies to quality control the daily data, summarize the daily data into monthly values, and creating maps to visualize the information. There are maps for minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation. There are two types of data that can be displayed; maps for a particular month and year from 1895 to present, or climatology maps. The climatology maps represent average values from 1981 to 2010. These are also known as the '1981-2010 Normals'." (Published April 18, 2016)
Source: United States. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Climate Change Topics: Models and Tools / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted April 20, 2016)

 

Most Americans say climate changing, humans to blame

News article Most Americans say climate changing, humans to blame (Published April 19, 2016)
Source: Desert Sun
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted April 19, 2016)

 

Is the California drought America's water wake-up call? (Opinion, Jay Famiglietti)

News article Is the California drought America's water wake-up call? (Opinion, Jay Famiglietti) (Published April 17, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 18, 2016)

 

New Sea Level Rise Study Calls Delta Tunnels Into Doubt

News article New Sea Level Rise Study Calls Delta Tunnels Into Doubt (Published April 14, 2016)
Source: KCET-TV (Los Angeles)
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 15, 2016)

 

Living with less snow in the West: What global warming means for our water supplies

News article Living with less snow in the West: What global warming means for our water supplies (Published April 14, 2016)
Source: Desert Sun
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 14, 2016)

 

Stream study provides insight for water storage in the West

News article Stream study provides insight for water storage in the West
Related Link: http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/11/4/044015/meta
(Published April 13, 2016)
Source: Deseret News
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 14, 2016)

 

Restored Wetlands in California May Be Source Of Greenhouse Gases

News article Restored Wetlands in California May Be Source Of Greenhouse Gases (Published April 13, 2016)
Source: Capital Public Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystem Services and Climate Change / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Greenhouse gas (GHG) increases /
(Posted April 14, 2016)

 

Energy budget increases reduce mean streamflow more than snow-rain transitions: using integrated modeling to isolate climate change impacts on Rocky Mountain hydrology

Report Energy budget increases reduce mean streamflow more than snow-rain transitions: using integrated modeling to isolate climate change impacts on Rocky Mountain hydrology - "In snow-dominated mountain regions, a warming climate is expected to alter two drivers of hydrology: (1) decrease the fraction of precipitation falling as snow; and (2) increase surface energy available to drive evapotranspiration. This study uses a novel integrated modeling approach to explicitly separate energy budget increases via warming from precipitation phase transitions from snow to rain in two mountain headwaters transects of the central Rocky Mountains. Both phase transitions and energy increases had significant, though unique, impacts on semi-arid mountain hydrology in our simulations. A complete shift in precipitation from snow to rain reduced streamflow between 11% and 18%, while 4 degrees C of uniform warming reduced streamflow between 19% and 23%, suggesting that changes in energy-driven evaporative loss, between 27% and 29% for these uniform warming scenarios, may be the dominant driver of annual mean streamflow in a warming climate. Phase changes induced a flashier system, making water availability more susceptible to precipitation variability and eliminating the runoff signature characteristic of snowmelt-dominated systems. The impact of a phase change on mean streamflow was reduced as aridity increased from west to east of the continental divide." (Foster, L. M., et al., 2016, Environmental Research Letters) (Published April 13, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted April 14, 2016)

 

The downside risk of climate change in California's Central Valley agricultural sector

Report The downside risk of climate change in California's Central Valley agricultural sector - "Downscaled climate change projections for California, when translated into changes in irrigation water delivery and then into profit from agriculture in the Central Valley, show an increase in conventional measures of variability such as the variance. However, these increases are modest and mask a more pronounced increase in downside risk, defined as the probability of unfavorable outcomes of water supply or profit. This paper describes the concept of downside risk and measures it as it applies to outcomes for Central Valley agriculture projected under four climate change scenarios. We compare the effect of downside risk aversion versus conventional risk aversion or risk neutrality when assessing the impact of climate change on the profitability of Central Valley agriculture. We find that, when downside risk is considered, the assessment of losses due to climate change increases substantially." (Hanemann, M., et al., 2016, Climatic Change) (Published April 4, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Agriculture / California: Statewide /
(Posted April 13, 2016)

 

Another study says warming may be worse than experts think

News article Another study says warming may be worse than experts think
Related Link: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/352/6282/224
(Published April 12, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: Clouds, aerosols, air pollution, ozone, humidity / Temperature /
(Posted April 12, 2016)

 

Observational constraints on mixed-phase clouds imply higher climate sensitivity

Report Observational constraints on mixed-phase clouds imply higher climate sensitivity - "Global climate model (GCM) estimates of the equilibrium global mean surface temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2, measured by the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS), range from 2.0 degrees to 4.6 degrees C. Clouds are among the leading causes of this uncertainty. Here we show that the ECS can be up to 1.3 degrees C higher in simulations where mixed-phase clouds consisting of ice crystals and supercooled liquid droplets are constrained by global satellite observations. The higher ECS estimates are directly linked to a weakened cloud-phase feedback arising from a decreased cloud glaciation rate in a warmer climate. We point out the need for realistic representations of the supercooled liquid fraction in mixed-phase clouds in GCMs, given the sensitivity of the ECS to the cloud-phase feedback." (Tan, I., et al., 2016, Science) (Published April 8, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Clouds, aerosols, air pollution, ozone, humidity / Temperature /
(Posted April 12, 2016)

 

San Francisco Bay Shore Inventory: Mapping for Sea Level Rise Planning

Report San Francisco Bay Shore Inventory: Mapping for Sea Level Rise Planning - "To provide a comprehensive and consistent picture of today’s Bay shore, SFEI mapped and inventoried Bay shore features that could affect flooding and flood routing for all nine Bay Area counties. While many different detailed levee layers exist, the region currently lacks a standardized regional dataset of elevated Bay shore features, accredited or not. Mapping extends up to 10 feet above Mean Higher High Water and includes many shore features: engineered levees, berms, embankments, transportation structures, wetlands, natural shoreline, channel openings, and water control structures. Features were attributed with elevation, FEMA accreditation, how a structure was armored, whether a structure was fronted by a wetland or beach, ownership, and the entity responsible for maintenance, if known." GIS dataset and report available. (Published April 7, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Estuary Institute
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 8, 2016)

 

NASA Sea Level Change Portal

Report NASA Sea Level Change Portal - Explanations, news, data on sea level rise. (Published April 4, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted April 6, 2016)

 

The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment

Report The Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A Scientific Assessment - Includes projections of seasonal and geographic changes in waterborne illness risk, increased exposure risk from runoff from extreme precipitation, and increased water infrastructure failure (chapter 6). (Published April 4, 2016)
Source: United States. Global Change Research Program
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Water quality /
(Posted April 6, 2016)

 

California's drought: Get used to it, scientists say

News article California's drought: Get used to it, scientists say (Published April 2, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Sea-level rise could nearly double over earlier estimates in next 100 years

News article Sea-level rise could nearly double over earlier estimates in next 100 years
Related Link: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v531/n7596/full/nature17145.html
(Published March 30, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Sea and Polar ice / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Rise of the ridiculously resilient ridge: California drought patterns becoming more common

News article Rise of the ridiculously resilient ridge: California drought patterns becoming more common (Published April 1, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

California May Be In for Greater Weather Extremes

News article California May Be In for Greater Weather Extremes (Published April 1, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Drought / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Stanford study: California moving toward more extreme weather

News article Stanford study: California moving toward more extreme weather
Related Link: http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/2/4/e1501344
(Published April 2, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Trends in atmospheric patterns conducive to seasonal precipitation and temperature extremes in California

Report Trends in atmospheric patterns conducive to seasonal precipitation and temperature extremes in California - "Recent evidence suggests that changes in atmospheric circulation have altered the probability of extreme climate events in the Northern Hemisphere. We investigate northeastern Pacific atmospheric circulation patterns that have historically (1949-2015) been associated with cool-season (October-May) precipitation and temperature extremes in California. We identify changes in occurrence of atmospheric circulation patterns by measuring the similarity of the cool-season atmospheric configuration that occurred in each year of the 1949-2015 period with the configuration that occurred during each of the five driest, wettest, warmest, and coolest years. Our analysis detects statistically significant changes in the occurrence of atmospheric patterns associated with seasonal precipitation and temperature extremes. We also find a robust increase in the magnitude and subseasonal persistence of the cool-season West Coast ridge, resulting in an amplification of the background state. Changes in both seasonal mean and extreme event configurations appear to be caused by a combination of spatially nonuniform thermal expansion of the atmosphere and reinforcing trends in the pattern of sea level pressure. In particular, both thermal expansion and sea level pressure trends contribute to a notable increase in anomalous northeastern Pacific ridging patterns similar to that observed during the 2012-2015 California drought. Collectively, our empirical findings suggest that the frequency of atmospheric conditions like those during California's most severely dry and hot years has increased in recent decades, but not necessarily at the expense of patterns associated with extremely wet years" (Swain, D. L., et al., 2016, Science Advances) (Published April 1, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise

Report Contribution of Antarctica to past and future sea-level rise - "Here we use a model coupling ice sheet and climate dynamics—including previously underappreciated processes linking atmospheric warming with hydrofracturing of buttressing ice shelves and structural collapse of marine-terminating ice cliffs—that is calibrated against Pliocene and Last Interglacial sea-level estimates and applied to future greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Antarctica has the potential to contribute more than a metre of sea-level rise by 2100 and more than 15?metres by 2500, if emissions continue unabated." (DeConto, R. M. and D. Pollard, 2016, Nature) (Published March 30, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Sea and Polar ice / Sea level rise /
(Posted April 4, 2016)

 

Pacific Ocean Pattern Could Predict U.S. Heat Waves

News article Pacific Ocean Pattern Could Predict U.S. Heat Waves (Published March 28, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted March 30, 2016)

 

Got Dirt? To Fight Sea Level Rise, Bay Area Marshland Projects Seeking Lots Of Mud

News article Got Dirt? To Fight Sea Level Rise, Bay Area Marshland Projects Seeking Lots Of Mud (Published March 29, 2016)
Source: SFist
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 29, 2016)

 

How to Talk Global Warming in Plain English

News article How to Talk Global Warming in Plain English (Published March 28, 2016)
Source: Scientific American
Climate Change Topics: Politics, laws, United Nations, etc. /
(Posted March 28, 2016)

 

Get Used to Skimpier Snows in the Sierra

News article Get Used to Skimpier Snows in the Sierra (Published March 23, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 24, 2016)

 

Study: Farms, hydropower at risk in West's changing climate

News article Study: Farms, hydropower at risk in West's changing climate (Published March 23, 2016)
Source: Associated Press
Climate Change Topics: Agriculture / California: Statewide / Energy management and conservation /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

Record warmth in February

News article Record warmth in February (Published March 17, 2016)
Source: U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

Feds warn of new threats to water supplies with climate change

News article Feds warn of new threats to water supplies with climate change
Related Link: http://www.usbr.gov/climate/secure/index.html
(Published March 23, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

Innovative California Water Agency Initiatives Highlighted at White House Water Summit

News article Innovative California Water Agency Initiatives Highlighted at White House Water Summit (Published March 22, 2016)
Source: Association of California Water Agencies
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / California: Water/Flood Protection Districts / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

SECURE Water Act Section 9503(c) -- Reclamation, Climate Change, and Water, 2016

Report SECURE Water Act Section 9503(c) -- Reclamation, Climate Change, and Water, 2016 - "The SECURE Water Report identifies climate change as a growing risk to Western water management and cites warmer temperatures, changes to precipitation, snowpack and the timing and quality of streamflow runoff across major river basins as threats to water sustainability. Water supply, quality and operations; hydropower; groundwater resources; flood control; recreation; and fish, wildlife and other ecological resources in the Western states remain at risk. The report, which responds to requirements under the SECURE Water Act of 2009, shows several increased risks to western United States water resources during the 21st century. This is the second report produced for Congress. The first report was produced in 2011." Related: Data visualization (Published March 22, 2016)
Source: United States. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Flooding / Groundwater / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Streamflow / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

Climate Change Orientation Presentations

Report Climate Change Orientation Presentations - Videos and slides from presentations to USBR staff: Climate Change 101, how climate change relates to Reclamation's mission, and what tools are available for strategy implementation. (Published December 7, 2015)
Source: United States. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted March 23, 2016)

 

Scientists Warn of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries

News article Scientists Warn of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries (Published March 23, 2016)
Source: New York Times
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts / Temperature /
(Posted March 22, 2016)

 

Scientists set out costs of sea level rise

News article Scientists set out costs of sea level rise (Published March 21, 2016)
Source: Environmental Research Web
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted March 21, 2016)

 

Climate Change Spells Trouble for Calif. Water

News article Climate Change Spells Trouble for Calif. Water (Published March 16, 2016)
Source: Courthouse News Service
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 17, 2016)

 

California Amphibian and Reptile Species of Future Concern: Conservation and Climate Change

Report California Amphibian and Reptile Species of Future Concern: Conservation and Climate Change - "Depending on ranking metric, approximately 60-75% of reptile and amphibian species were predicted to experience little (<20%) direct loss of climatically suitable habitat by 2050. Reductions in climatic habitat suitability were predicted to be largest for reptiles in the southern mountains and deserts, with reductions for amphibians occurring statewide. The species ranked highest for risk include many that are already of conservation concern and tend to be endemic species with small ranges, such as the black toad, Bufo exsul. The modeled predictions for future habitat suitability presented in this study can be used to inform conservation of California’s reptile and amphibian diversity under climate change, particularly by prioritizing species and regions for monitoring and additional research." (Published August 31, 2013)
Source: California. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted March 17, 2016)

 

Bureau of Reclamation's Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study Predicts How Climate Change Will Impact the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta

News article Bureau of Reclamation's Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study Predicts How Climate Change Will Impact the Sacramento and San Joaquin Delta
Related Link: http://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/bsp
(Published March 15, 2016)
Source: U.S. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 16, 2016)

 

Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study

Report Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers Basin Study - Finds that climate impacts in the Delta include: temperature, precipitation, snowpack, runoff, and sea level. This study uses more recent socioeconomic and climate scenarios than earlier studies. Has a companion Technical Report and Technical Appendices. (Published March 15, 2016)
Source: United States. Bureau of Reclamation
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Sea level rise / Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 16, 2016)

 

13.1 million U.S. coastal residents could face flooding because of rising sea levels

News article 13.1 million U.S. coastal residents could face flooding because of rising sea levels
Related Link: http://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nclimate2961.html
(Published March 15, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 15, 2016)

 

Up to 13 Million Americans Are at Risk of Being Washed Away

News article Up to 13 Million Americans Are at Risk of Being Washed Away (Published March 15, 2016)
Source: Bloomberg News
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 15, 2016)

 

Millions projected to be at risk from sea-level rise in the continental United States

Report Millions projected to be at risk from sea-level rise in the continental United States - "Sea-level rise (SLR) is one of the most apparent climate change stressors facing human society. Although it is known that many people at present inhabit areas vulnerable to SLR, few studies have accounted for ongoing population growth when assessing the potential magnitude of future impacts. Here we address this issue by coupling a small-area population projection with a SLR vulnerability assessment across all United States coastal counties. We find that a 2100 SLR of 0.9 m places a land area projected to house 4.2 million people at risk of inundation, whereas 1.8 m affects 13.1 million people -- approximately three times larger than indicated by current populations. These results suggest that the absence of protective measures could lead to US population movements of a magnitude similar to the twentieth century Great Migration of southern African-Americans. Furthermore, our population projection approach can be readily adapted to assess other hazards or to model future per capita economic impacts." Supplementary information (Hauer, M. E., et al., 2016, Nature Climate Change) (Published March 14, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 15, 2016)

 

Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change

Report Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change - "As climate has warmed over recent years, a new pattern of more frequent and more intense weather events has unfolded across the globe. Climate models simulate such changes in extreme events, and some of the reasons for the changes are well understood. Warming increases the likelihood of extremely hot days and nights, favors increased atmospheric moisture that may result in more frequent heavy rainfall and snowfall, and leads to evaporation that can exacerbate droughts. Even with evidence of these broad trends, scientists cautioned in the past that individual weather events couldn’t be attributed to climate change. Now, with advances in understanding the climate science behind extreme events and the science of extreme event attribution, such blanket statements may not be accurate. The relatively young science of extreme event attribution seeks to tease out the influence of human-cause climate change from other factors, such as natural sources of variability like El Nino, as contributors to individual extreme events. Event attribution can answer questions about how much climate change influenced the probability or intensity of a specific type of weather event. As event attribution capabilities improve, they could help inform choices about assessing and managing risk, and in guiding climate adaptation strategies. This report examines the current state of science of extreme weather attribution, and identifies ways to move the science forward to improve attribution capabilities." (Published March 11, 2016)
Source: National Academies
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 14, 2016)

 

It's official: We can now say global warming has made some weather events worse

News article It's official: We can now say global warming has made some weather events worse
Related Link: http://www.nap.edu/catalog/21852/attribution-of-extreme-weather-events-in-the-context-of-climate-change
(Published March 12, 2016)
Source: Washington Post
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 11, 2016)

 

SF Planning Department gets ready to get ready for sea-level rise

News article SF Planning Department gets ready to get ready for sea-level rise
Related Link: http://sf-planning.org/index.aspx?page=4439
(Published March 11, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Sea level rise / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation /
(Posted March 11, 2016)

 

More extreme precipitation in the world's dry and wet regions

Report More extreme precipitation in the world's dry and wet regions - "Intensification of the hydrological cycle is expected to accompany a warming climate. It has been suggested that changes in the spatial distribution of precipitation will amplify differences between dry and wet regions, but this has been disputed for changes over land. Furthermore, precipitation changes may differ not only between regions but also between different aspects of precipitation, such as totals and extremes. Here we investigate changes in these two aspects in the world’s dry and wet regions using observations and global climate models. Despite uncertainties in total precipitation changes, extreme daily precipitation averaged over both dry and wet regimes shows robust increases in both observations and climate models over the past six decades. Climate projections for the rest of the century show continued intensification of daily precipitation extremes. Increases in total and extreme precipitation in dry regions are linearly related to the model-specific global temperature change, so that the spread in projected global warming partly explains the spread in precipitation intensification in these regions by the late twenty-first century. This intensification has implications for the risk of flooding as the climate warms, particularly for the world’s dry regions." (Donat, M. G., et al., 2016, Nature Climate Change) (Published March 7, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 11, 2016)

 

San Francisco Sea Level Rise Action Plan

Report San Francisco Sea Level Rise Action Plan - "The Sea Level Rise Action Plan completes four strategic tasks: 1) Establishes an overarching vision, goals, and a set of guiding principles for sea level rise planning; 2) Summarizes current climate science, relevant policies and regulations, and vulnerability and risk assessments conducted to date; 3) Identifies data gaps and establish a framework for further assessment, adaptation planning, and implementation; and 4) Provides the foundation and guidance to develop a citywide Sea Level Rise Adaptation Plan" (Published March 10, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Bay Area and Delta / Flooding / Sample Climate Action Plans / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 11, 2016)

 

DWR Honored with Second National Climate Leadership Award

News article DWR Honored with Second National Climate Leadership Award (Published March 9, 2016)
Source: California Dept. of Water Resources
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted March 10, 2016)

 

Don't waste the money: Key climate experts skeptical of forecasts (Opinion)

News article Don't waste the money: Key climate experts skeptical of forecasts (Opinion) (Published March 10, 2016)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 10, 2016)

 

Coastal communities face extreme peril, must prepare (Opinion)

News article Coastal communities face extreme peril, must prepare (Opinion) (Published March 10, 2016)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted March 10, 2016)

 

Why Scientists Think the Planet Is Heating Up So Fast Right Now

News article Why Scientists Think the Planet Is Heating Up So Fast Right Now (Published March 2, 2016)
Source: Gizmodo
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted March 9, 2016)

 

Uncertainty and Extreme Events in Future Climate and Hydrologic Projections for the Pacific Northwest: Providing a Basis for Vulnerability and Core/Corridor Assessments

Report Uncertainty and Extreme Events in Future Climate and Hydrologic Projections for the Pacific Northwest: Providing a Basis for Vulnerability and Core/Corridor Assessments - "The purpose of this project was to (1) provide an internally-consistent set of downscaled projections across the Western U.S., (2) include information about projection uncertainty, and (3) assess projected changes of hydrologic extremes. These objectives were designed to address decision support needs for climate adaptation and resource management actions. Specifically, understanding of uncertainty in climate projections -- in particular for extreme events -- is currently a key scientific and management barrier to adaptation planning and vulnerability assessment. The new dataset fills in the Northwest domain to cover a key gap in the previous dataset, adds additional projections (both from other global climate models and a comparison with dynamical downscaling) and includes an assessment of changes to flow and soil moisture extremes. This new information can be used to assess variations in impacts across the landscape, uncertainty in projections, and how these differ as a function of region, variable, and time period." (Published May 2, 2014)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 9, 2016)

 

A Twenty-First-Century California Observing Network for Monitoring Extreme Weather Events

Report A Twenty-First-Century California Observing Network for Monitoring Extreme Weather Events - "During Northern Hemisphere winters, the West Coast of North America is battered by extratropical storms. The impact of these storms is of paramount concern to California, where aging water supply and flood protection infrastructures are challenged by increased standards for urban flood protection, an unusually variable weather regime, and projections of climate change. Additionally, there are inherent conflicts between releasing water to provide flood protection and storing water to meet requirements for the water supply, water quality, hydropower generation, water temperature and flow for at-risk species, and recreation. To improve reservoir management and meet the increasing demands on water, improved forecasts of precipitation, especially during extreme events, are required. Here, the authors describe how California is addressing their most important and costliest environmental issue -- water management -- in part, by installing a state-of-the-art observing system to better track the area’s most severe wintertime storms." (White, A. B., et al., 2013, Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology) (Published May 10, 2013)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted March 9, 2016)

 

Natural Resources Agency Releases Plan to Guide the State's Climate Change Adaptation

News article Natural Resources Agency Releases Plan to Guide the State's Climate Change Adaptation
Related Link: http://resources.ca.gov/climate/safeguarding/
(Published March 8, 2016)
Source: California Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted March 8, 2016)

 

Safeguarding California: Implementation Action Plans

Report Safeguarding California: Implementation Action Plans - Includes plans for the water, agricultural, biodiversity and habitat, emergency management, energy, land use, and public health sectors. (Published March 8, 2016)
Source: California. Natural Resources Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Agriculture / California: Bay Area and Delta / California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Energy management and conservation / Flooding / Groundwater / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted March 8, 2016)

 

Why is 2016 smashing heat records?

News article Why is 2016 smashing heat records? (Published March 4, 2016)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Temperature /
(Posted March 4, 2016)

 

Are climate-change adaptations tied to protecting property or people? Study follows the money

News article Are climate-change adaptations tied to protecting property or people? Study follows the money (Published March 1, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Global issues, human impacts /
(Posted March 1, 2016)

 

Silicon Valley benefits from community choice in energy (Opinion)

News article Silicon Valley benefits from community choice in energy (Opinion) (Published March 1, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) /
(Posted March 1, 2016)

 

S.J. should opt for clean energy plan (Editorial)

News article S.J. should opt for clean energy plan (Editorial) (Published March 1, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) /
(Posted March 1, 2016)

 

Tax to help protect San Francisco Bay from sea level rise is needed (Editorial)

News article Tax to help protect San Francisco Bay from sea level rise is needed (Editorial) (Published February 27, 2016)
Source: San Jose Mercury News
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted February 29, 2016)

 

Incorporating Climate Resilience into Invasive Plant Management Projects: Guidance for Land Managers

Report Incorporating Climate Resilience into Invasive Plant Management Projects: Guidance for Land Managers - "Cal-IPC’s recent work designing regional invasive plant management projects includes climate resilience as a goal. In particular, we have undertaken an effort to protect Sierra meadows from invasive plants, with support from the Wildlife Conservation Society’s Climate Adaptation Fund. This report describes our perspective on connections between invasive plant management and climate resiliency, and provides guidance for land managers on how they can incorporate climate resilience into their invasive plant management projects." (California Invasive Plant Council) (Published December 30, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted February 29, 2016)

 

Salt marshes will persist despite rising seas, study predicts

News article Salt marshes will persist despite rising seas, study predicts (Published February 24, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species / Sea-Level and Flood Risks: FEMA or Insurance Industry Responses /
(Posted February 25, 2016)

 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Climate Change Adaptation Plan

Report U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Climate Change Adaptation Plan - "The Adaptation Plan relies on peer-reviewed scientific information and expert judgment to begin to identify potential vulnerabilities to EPA’s mission from climate change. The Adaptation Plan also presents priority actions the Agency will take to integrate climate adaptation planning into its programs, policies, rules, and operations to ensure they are effective in a changing climate. EPA’s focus on climate adaptation is part of a larger federal effort to promote a healthy and prosperous nation that is resilient to a changing climate." Related: 17 implementation plans for EPA offices and regions. (Published October 31, 2014)
Source: United States. Environmental Protection Agency
Climate Change Topics: Adaptation / Water quality / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 25, 2016)

 

City of San Diego Climate Action Plan

Report City of San Diego Climate Action Plan - Proposes ambitious goals for greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions by 2020 and 2035 through five strategies: energy and water efficient buildings; clean and renewable energy; bicycling, walking, transit and land use; zero waste (gas and waste mangement); and climate resiliency. (Published December 15, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Energy management and conservation / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation / Land Use, environmental management systems, and regulation / Renewable energy / Sample Climate Action Plans /
(Posted February 25, 2016)

 

Increased flooding in US coastal cities caused by climate change, study says

News article Increased flooding in US coastal cities caused by climate change, study says (Published February 24, 2016)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted February 24, 2016)

 

Unnatural Coastal Floods: Sea level rise and the human fingerprint on U.S. floods since 1950

Report Unnatural Coastal Floods: Sea level rise and the human fingerprint on U.S. floods since 1950 - "Human-caused global sea level rise effectively tipped the balance, pushing high water events over the threshold, for about two-thirds of the observed flood days. The fraction has increased from less than half in the 1950s, to more than three-quarters within the last decade (2005-2014), as global sea level has continued to rise." (Strauss, B. H., et al., 2016, Climate Central) (Published February 22, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted February 24, 2016)

 

Assessment of precipitation anomalies in California using TRMM and MERRA data

Report Assessment of precipitation anomalies in California using TRMM and MERRA data - "California has a well-pronounced rain season that peaks in December-February. However, the 95% confidence interval around the climatological precipitation during these months imply that deviations on the order of 60% of the expected amounts are very likely during the most important period of the rain season. While these positive and negative anomalies alternate almost every year and tend to cancel each other, severe multiyear declines of precipitation in California appear on decadal scales. The 1986-1994 decline of precipitation was similar to the current one that started in 2011 and is apparent in the reanalysis data. In terms of accumulated deficits of precipitation, that episode was no less severe than the current one. While El Nino (the warm phase of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation, ENSO) is frequently cited as the natural forcing expected to bring a relief from drought, our assessment is that ENSO has been driving at best only 6% of precipitation variability in California in the past three decades. Using fractional risk analysis of precipitation during typical versus drying periods, we show that the likelihood of losing the most intensive precipitation events drastically increases during the multiyear drying events. Storms delivering up to 50% of the precipitation in California are driven by atmospheric rivers making landfall. However, these phenomena can be suppressed and even blocked by persistent ridges of atmospheric pressure in the northeast Pacific." (Savtchenko, A. K., et al., 2015, Journal of Geophysical Research) (Published August 25, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted February 24, 2016)

 

Study confirms human effects on sea level rise

News article Study confirms human effects on sea level rise
Related Link: http://sealevel.climatecentral.org/uploads/research/Unnatural-Coastal-Floods-2016.pdf
(Published February 24, 2016)
Source: Sacramento Bee
Climate Change Topics: Flooding / Sea level rise /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

Even in sunny L.A., warming weather may be the next big public health problem

News article Even in sunny L.A., warming weather may be the next big public health problem (Published February 23, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Global issues, human impacts /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

Sea levels rising at fastest rate in 2,800 years due to global warming, studies show

News article Sea levels rising at fastest rate in 2,800 years due to global warming, studies show
Related Link: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/02/17/1517056113.abstract
(Published February 23, 2016)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

Temperature-driven global sea-level variability in the Common Era

Report Temperature-driven global sea-level variability in the Common Era - We present the first, to our knowledge, estimate of global sea-level (GSL) change over the last ~3,000 years that is based upon statistical synthesis of a global database of regional sea-level reconstructions. GSL varied by ~plus or minus 8 cm over the pre-Industrial Common Era, with a notable decline over 1000–1400 CE coinciding with ~0.2 degrees C of global cooling. The 20th century rise was extremely likely faster than during any of the 27 previous centuries. Semiempirical modeling indicates that, without global warming, GSL in the 20th century very likely would have risen by between -3 cm and +7 cm, rather than the ~14 cm observed. Semiempirical 21st century projections largely reconcile differences between Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change projections and semiempirical models. (Kopp, R. E., 2016, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) (Published February 22, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

Projecting changes in regional temperature and precipitation extremes in the United States

Report Projecting changes in regional temperature and precipitation extremes in the United States - "Regional and local climate extremes, and their impacts, result from the multifaceted interplay between large-scale climate forcing, local environmental factors (physiography), and societal vulnerability. In this paper, we review historical and projected changes in temperature and precipitation extremes in the United States, with a focus on strengths and weaknesses of (1) commonly used definitions for extremes such as thresholds and percentiles, (2) statistical approaches to quantifying changes in extremes, such as extreme value theory, and (3) methods for post-processing (downscaling) global climate models (GCMs) to investigate regional and local climate. We additionally derive regional and local estimates of changes in temperature extremes by applying a quantile mapping approach to high-resolution gridded daily temperature data for 6 U.S. sub-regions. Consistent with the background warming in the parent GCMs, we project decreases in regional and local cold extremes and increases in regional and local warm extremes throughout the domain, but the downscaling approach removes bias and produces substantial spatial variability within the relatively small sub-regions. We finish with recommendations for future research on regional climate extremes, suggesting that focus be placed on improving understanding of extremes in the context of large-scale circulation and evaluating the corresponding cascade of scale interactions within GCMs." (School, J. T. and S. M. Robeson, 2016, Weather and Climate Extremes) (Published October 9, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Temperature /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

A climate change vulnerability assessment of California's terrestrial vegetation

Report A climate change vulnerability assessment of California's terrestrial vegetation - "Sixteen of 29 natural vegetation community types in California are highly or nearly highly vulnerable to four alternate projected climates by the end of this century. The remaining 13 natural community types have moderate vulnerability. Vulnerability was determined by using a detailed 2015 map of the spatial patterns of California’s vegetation community types, and examining how climate conditions will change at those locations. This study also identified biological traits of the dominant plant species that make up the vegetation community types, and found that different types have different levels of sensitivity and adaptive capacity to changing climate. Yet, even the more robust and widespread community types, like California’s Foothill and Valley Forests and Woodlands, or Chaparral are moderately vulnerable, with impacts to 28-53% and 12-47% of their current extent, respectively. The variation in the four alternate climate projections had a much larger effect on vulnerability than the biological attributes." (Published February 5, 2016)
Source: University of California, Davis
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted February 23, 2016)

 

Method to predict local climate change developed

News article Method to predict local climate change developed (Published February 18, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Models and Tools /
(Posted February 18, 2016)

 

How climate change may lead to depletion of western US groundwater

News article How climate change may lead to depletion of western US groundwater
Related Link: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022169415009750
(Published February 17, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Groundwater /
(Posted February 18, 2016)

 

Study: NASA satellites show areas growing drier, wetter

News article Study: NASA satellites show areas growing drier, wetter
Related Link: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/351/6274/699
(Published February 17, 2016)
Source: Desert Sun
Climate Change Topics: Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 17, 2016)

 

Considering climate change in water resources planning

Report Considering climate change in water resources planning - "A look at the DWR's efforts to address climate change impacts, as well as the modeling tools used in climate change analysis." Report of DWR staff presentations to the January 2016 meeting of the California Water Commission. (Published February 17, 2016)
Source: California. Dept. of Water Resources
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Models and Tools / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack / Water utilities guidance /
(Posted February 17, 2016)

 

Implications of projected climate change for groundwater recharge in the western United States

Report Implications of projected climate change for groundwater recharge in the western United States - "An analysis of the potential impact of climate change on groundwater recharge across the western United States (west of 100 degrees longitude) is presented synthesizing existing studies and applying current knowledge of recharge processes and amounts. Eight representative aquifers located across the region were evaluated. For each aquifer published recharge budget components were converted into four standard recharge mechanisms: diffuse, focused, irrigation, and mountain-systems recharge. Future changes in individual recharge mechanisms and total recharge were then estimated for each aquifer. Model-based studies of projected climate-change effects on recharge were available and utilized for half of the aquifers. For the remainder, forecasted changes in temperature and precipitation were logically propagated through each recharge mechanism producing qualitative estimates of direction of changes in recharge only (not magnitude). Several key patterns emerge from the analysis. First, the available estimates indicate average declines of 10-20% in total recharge across the southern aquifers, but with a wide range of uncertainty that includes no change. Second, the northern set of aquifers will likely incur little change to slight increases in total recharge. Third, mountain system recharge is expected to decline across much of the region due to decreased snowpack, with that impact lessening with higher elevation and latitude." (Meixner, T., 2016, Journal of Hydrology) (Published January 4, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Groundwater /
(Posted February 17, 2016)

 

Candidates and Local Leaders Need to Face Up to Climate Change

News article Candidates and Local Leaders Need to Face Up to Climate Change (Published February 12, 2016)
Source: Huffington Post
Climate Change Topics: California: Bay Area and Delta / Drought / Flooding / Precipitation, Extreme Weather / Santa Clara Valley Water District /
(Posted February 16, 2016)

 

Thirsty continents are slowing down expected sea level rise, scientists say

News article Thirsty continents are slowing down expected sea level rise, scientists say (Published February 15, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 16, 2016)

 

A decade of sea level rise slowed by climate-driven hydrology

Report A decade of sea level rise slowed by climate-driven hydrology - "Climate-driven changes in land water storage and their contributions to sea level rise have been absent from Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change sea level budgets owing to observational challenges. Recent advances in satellite measurement of time-variable gravity combined with reconciled global glacier loss estimates enable a disaggregation of continental land mass changes and a quantification of this term. We found that between 2002 and 2014, climate variability resulted in an additional 3200 plus or minus 900 gigatons of water being stored on land. This gain partially offset water losses from ice sheets, glaciers, and groundwater pumping, slowing the rate of sea level rise by 0.71 plus or minus 0.20 millimeters per year. These findings highlight the importance of climate-driven changes in hydrology when assigning attribution to decadal changes in sea level." (Reager, J. T., et al., 2016, Science) (Published February 12, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted February 16, 2016)

 

Decade of rising seas slowed by land soaking up extra water

News article Decade of rising seas slowed by land soaking up extra water (Published February 11, 2016)
Source: Science Daily
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 12, 2016)

 

U.S. winters getting less snowy, more soggy

News article U.S. winters getting less snowy, more soggy (Published February 12, 2016)
Source: San Francisco Chronicle
Climate Change Topics: Temperature / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 12, 2016)

 

Supreme Court deals blow to Obama by putting his climate change rules on hold

News article Supreme Court deals blow to Obama by putting his climate change rules on hold (Published February 10, 2016)
Source: Los Angeles Times
Climate Change Topics: Federal Regulations, EPA, Clean Air Act / Greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction, mitigation /
(Posted February 10, 2016)

 

A projection of changes in landfalling atmospheric river frequency and extreme precipitation over western North America from the Large Ensemble CESM simulations

Report A projection of changes in landfalling atmospheric river frequency and extreme precipitation over western North America from the Large Ensemble CESM simulations - "Simulations from the Community Earth System Model (CESM) Large Ensemble project are analyzed to investigate the impact of global warming on atmospheric rivers (ARs) making landfall in western North America. The model has notable biases in simulating the subtropical jet position and the relationship between extreme precipitation and moisture transport. After accounting for these biases, the model projects an ensemble mean increase of 35% in the number of landfalling AR days between the last 20 years of the twentieth and 21st centuries under Representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP8.5). However, the associated extreme precipitation days increase only by 28% because the moisture transport required to produce extreme precipitation also increases with warming. Internal variability introduces an uncertainty of plus or minus 8% and plus or minus 7% in the changes in AR days and associated extreme precipitation days compared to only about 1% difference from accountings for model biases. The significantly larger mean changes compared to internal variability, and effects of model biases highlight the robust AR responses to global warming." Keyword: ARkstrorm. (Hagos, S. M., et al., 2016, Geophysical Research Letters) (Published February 6, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted February 10, 2016)

 

Climate Information: A National System Could Help Federal, State, Local, and Private Sector Decision Makers Use Climate Information

Report Climate Information: A National System Could Help Federal, State, Local, and Private Sector Decision Makers Use Climate Information - "This report examines (1) the extent to which federal efforts meet the climate information needs of decision makers; (2) examples of how other countries organized climate information systems; (3) whether and how federal efforts could be improved; and (4) the strengths and limitations of different options to provide climate information. GAO analyzed reports; reviewed systems in three other countries; and interviewed stakeholders with knowledge of climate information." (Published December 8, 2015)
Climate Change Topics: Models and Tools /
(Posted February 10, 2016)

 

California Is Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change

News article California Is Likely to Be Stormier With Climate Change
Related Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL067392/full
(Published February 9, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Precipitation, Extreme Weather /
(Posted February 9, 2016)

 

Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind

News article Climate Change Is Leaving Native Plants Behind (Published February 8, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Ecosystems, Habitat, Threatened Species /
(Posted February 9, 2016)

 

Sea-level rise 'could last twice as long as human history'

News article Sea-level rise 'could last twice as long as human history' (Published February 9, 2016)
Source: Guardian (U.K.)
Climate Change Topics: Sea level rise /
(Posted February 9, 2016)

 

California's Water Supply at Risk From Warmer Winters

News article California's Water Supply at Risk From Warmer Winters (Published February 8, 2016)
Source: KQED Radio
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 8, 2016)

 

Are drought conditions in the US Southwest here to stay?

News article Are drought conditions in the US Southwest here to stay?
Related Link: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL066727/full
(Published February 7, 2016)
Source: Christian Science Monitor
Climate Change Topics: Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 8, 2016)

 

The Most Important Water Stories of 2015

News article The Most Important Water Stories of 2015 (Published February 4, 2016)
Source: Huffington Post
Climate Change Topics: Drought /
(Posted February 8, 2016)

 

Running dry: The U.S. Southwest's drift into a drier climate state

Report Running dry: The U.S. Southwest's drift into a drier climate state - "Changes in precipitation have far-reaching consequences on human society and ecosystems as has been demonstrated by recent severe droughts in California and the Oklahoma region. Droughts are beside tropical cyclones the most costly weather and climate related extreme events in the U.S. We apply a weather type (WT) analysis to reanalysis data from 1979-2014 that characterize typical weather conditions over the contiguous United States. This enables us to assign precipitation trends within 1980-2010 to changes in WT frequencies and changes in precipitation intensities. We show that in the North Atlantic and Midwest region precipitation intensity changes are the major driver of increasing precipitation trends. In the U.S. Southwest, however, WT frequency changes lead to a significant precipitation decrease of up to -25% related to an increase in anticyclonic conditions in the North East Pacific. This trend is partly counteracted by increasing precipitation intensities." (Prein, A. F., et al., 2016, Geophysical Research Letters) (Published February 4, 2016)
Climate Change Topics: California: Statewide / Drought / Water supply, changes in supply, snowpack /
(Posted February 8, 2016)

 

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